Resident Evil Village

Genres/Tags: Action, Shooter, Survival, Third-person, 3D, Horror
Companies: Capcom Production Studio 4, Ubisoft Entertainment
Languages: RUS/ENG/MULTI6
Original Size: 9.5 GB
Repack Size: from 2.8 GB [Selective Download]

Resident Evil Village Fitgirl Repack Download PC Game

Resident Evil Village Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install Resident Evil Village Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download Resident Evil Village  Fit girl repack is free to play the game. Yes you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download Resident Evil Village  igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download Resident Evil Village  Fitgirl awesome game.

Download Mirrors Resident Evil Village

  • 1337x | KAT [magnet] [.torrent file only]
  • RuTor [magnet]
  • Tapochek.net
  • Filehoster: MultiUpload (10+ hosters, interchangeable) [Use JDownloader2]
  • Filehosters: DropArk + NitroFlare + MegaUp (Uploaded by Vikky793, not compatible with torrent)

Game Description

In the series’ Resident Evil Village in the series, Special agent Leon S. Kennedy is assigned to save his U.S. The daughter of the president, who is abducted. After locating the village of a rural community in Europe He is confronted with new dangers that mark different from the typical creepy zombies from earlier installments of the series. Leon fights terrifying new creatures that are infested by the new threat known as Las Plagas and fights with a group of aggressive adversaries, including villagers controlled by mind that are connected with Los Illuminados, the mysterious group that is responsible for the abduction.

TROUBLESHOOTING Resident Evil Village Fitgirl Repack Download

Also Read:

Continue reading Resident Evil Village

Madden NFL 19 Fitgirl Repack

Genres/Tags: Sports, American Football, Third-person, 3D
Companies: EA Tiburon, Electronic Arts
Language: ENG
Original Size: 39.9 GB
Repack Size: 29.4 GB

Madden NFL 19 Fitgirl Repack Download PC Game

Madden NFL 19 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install Madden NFL 19 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download Madden NFL 19 Fit girl repack is free to play the game. Yes you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download Madden NFL 19 igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download Madden NFL 19  Fitgirl awesome game.

Download Mirrors Madden NFL 19 Fitgirl Repack

  • 1337x | KAT [magnet] [.torrent file only]
  • Tapochek.net
  • Filehoster: MultiUpload (10+ hosters, interchangeable) [Use JDownloader2]
  • Filehoster: Good Old Downloads (NOT compatible with other mirrors)
  • Filehoster: Upera (Uploaded by Nice_2000, NOT compatible with other mirrors)
  • Filehoster: WorldSrc (NOT compatible with other mirrors)

Repack Features

  • Based on Madden.NFL.19-CODEX ISO release: codex-madden.nfl.19.iso (42,822,172,672 bytes)
  • 100% Lossless and MD5 100% Perfect All files are identical to their originals after installation (not including the trial exe that was removed)
  • Trial executable was removed, but nothing changed.
  • A smaller size archive (compressed to 39.9 (to 29.4 GB)
  • Installation time: 20 minutes for CPUs with 8 threads and 40 minutes for 4-threads CPU
  • Integrity check after installation so that you can be sure everything was installed correctly
  • The HDD’s space following installation space after installation: 43GB (up to 46 GB at installation)
  • Repack makes use of the XTool library provided by Razor12911.
  • A minimum of 2GB of memory (inc. the virtual) needed to install this pack

Game Description

Madden NFL 19 gives you an unprecedented control over your play both on both sides of the ball. Real Player Motion revolutionizes the game experience Madden giving you control of your gameplay with precision and focus. Create and share your own custom Draft Classes, create your game plan, develop your players, and follow your game plan using the latest positional archetypes available in Franchise. With Madden NFL 19 Ultimate Team you can train your players to be a part of your roster and guide your team to glory with the most innovative ways to compete.

TROUBLESHOOTING Madden NFL 19 Fitgirl Repack Download

Also Read:

The Co-insurance Clause

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause

Of the more important clauses in current use, the one most frequently used, most severely criticized, most mis¬ understood, most legislated against, and withal the most reasonable and most equitable, is that which in general terms is known as the “co-insurance clause.”
Insurance is one of the great necessities of our business, social and economic life, and the expense of maintaining it should be distributed among the property owners of the country as equitably as it is humanly possible so to do.
Losses and expenses are paid out of premiums col¬ lected. When a loss is total the penalty for underinsurance falls where it properly belongs, on the insured who has elected to save premium and assume a portion of the risk himself, and the same penalty for underinsurance should by contract be made to apply in case of partial loss as applies automatically in case of total loss.
If all losses were total, liberality on the part of the insured in the payment of premium would bring its own reward, and parsimony would bring its own penalty; but the records of the leading companies show that of all the losses sustained, about 65%—numerically—are less than $100; about 30% are between $100 and total; and about 5% are total. The natural inclination, therefore, on the part of the public, particularly on the less hazardous risks, is to under¬ insure and take the chance of not having a total loss; and this will generally be done except under special conditions, or when reasonably full insurance must be carried to sustain credit or as collateral security for loans. There were several strik¬ ing illustrations of this in the San Francisco conflagration, where the amount of insurance carried on so-called fireproof buildings was less than 10% of their value, and the insured in such instances, of course, paid a heavy penalty for their neglect to carry adequate insurance.
Co-insurance operates only in case of partial loss, where both the insurance carried and the loss sustained are less than the prescribed percentage named in the clause, and has the effect of preventing one who has insured for a small percentage of value and paid a correspondingly small pre¬ mium from collecting as much in the event of loss as one who has insured for a large percentage of value and paid a correspondingly large premium. We have high authority for the principle,
“He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly, and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.”
and it should be applied to contracts of insurance. Rating systems may come, and rating systems may go; but, unless the principle of co-insurance be recognized and universally applied, there can be no equitable division of the insurance burden, and the existing inequalities will go on forever. The principle is so well established in some countries that the general foreign form of policy issued by the London offices for use therein contains the full co-insurance clause in the printed conditions.
The necessity for co-insurance as an equalizer of rates was quite forcibly illustrated by a prominent underwriter in an ad¬ dress delivered several years ago, in the following example involving two buildings of superior construction:
“A’S” BUILDING “B’S” BUILDING
Value $100,000 Value $100,000
Insurance 80,000 Insurance 10,000
Rate 1% Rate 1%
Premium received— Premium received—
one year, 800 one year, 100
No Co-insurance Clause No Co-insurance Clause
Loss 800 Loss 800
Loss Collectible 800 Loss Collectible 800
“B” pays only one-eighth as much premium as “A,” yet both collect the same amount of loss, and in the absence of co-insurance conditions both would collect the same amount in all instances where the loss is $10,000 or less. Of course, if the loss should exceed $10,000, “A” would reap his reward, and “B” would pay his penalty. This situation clearly calls either for a difference in rate in favor of “A” or for a difference in loss collection as against “B,” and the latter can be regulated only through the medium of a co-insurance condition in the policy.
At this point it may not be amiss incidentally to inquire why the owner of a building which is heavily encumbered, whose policies are payable to a mortgagee (particularly a junior encumbrancer) under a mortgagee clause, and where subrogation may be of little or no value, should have the benefit of the same rate as the owner of another building of similar construction with similar occupancy, but unencum¬ bered.
In some states rates are made with and without co- insurance conditions, quite a material reduction in the basis rate being allowed for the insertion of the 80% clause in the policy, and a further reduction for the use of the 90% and 100% clauses. This, however, does not go far enough, and any variation in rate should be graded according to the co-insurance percentage named in the clause, and this gradation should not be restricted, as it is, to 80%, 90% or 100%, if the principle of equalization is to be maintained.
Various clauses designed to give practical effect to the co-insurance principle have been in use in this country for nearly forty years in connection with fire and other contracts of insurance. Some of these are well adapted to the purpose intended, while others fail to accomplish said purpose under certain conditions; but, fortunately, incidents of this nature are not of frequent occurrence.
There are, generally speaking, four forms, which differ quite materially in phraseology, and sometimes differ in prac¬ tical application. These four clauses are: (1) the old co- insurance clause; (2) the percentage co-insurance clause; (3) the average clause; (4) the reduced rate contribution clause.
Until recently, underwriters were complacently using some of these titles indiscriminately in certain portions of the country, under the assumption that the clauses, although differently phrased, were in effect the same, but they were subjected to quite a rude awakening by a decision which was handed down about a year ago by the Tennessee Court of Civic Appeals. The law in Tennessee permits the use of the three-fourths value clause and the co-insurance clause, but permits no other restrictive provisions. The form in use bore the inscription “Co-insurance Clause,” but the context was the phraseology of the reduced rate contribution clause, and although the result was the same under the operation of either, the court held that the form used was not the co- insurance clause, hence it was void and consequently inop¬ erative. Thompson vs. Concordia Fire Ins. Co. (Tenn. 1919) 215 S.W. Rep. 932, 55 Ins. Law Journal 122.
The law of Georgia provides that all insurance companies shall pay the full amount of loss sustained up to the amount of insurance expressed in the policy, and that all stipulations in such policies to the contrary shall be null and void. The law further provides that when the insured has several policies on the same property, his recovery from any company will be pro rata as to the amount thereof.
About twenty years ago, the Supreipe Court of Georgia was called upon to decide whether under the law referred to the old co-insurance clause then in use, which provided
“that the assured shall at all times maintain a total insurance upon the property insured by this policy of not less than 75% of the actual cash value thereof . . . . and that failing to do so, the assured shall
become a co-insurer to the extent of the deficiency,”
was valid and enforceable, and it decided that the clause was not violative of the law. Pekor vs. Fireman’s Fund Ins. Co. (1898) (106 Ga. page 1)

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause
The court evidently construed the clause as a binding agreement on the part of the insured to secure insurance up to a certain percentage of value, and virtually held that if the insured himself desired to take the place of another insurance company he was at liberty to do so as one way of fulfilling his agreement.

The Georgia courts, however, have not passed upon the validity of the reduced rate contribution clause in connection with the statutory law above referred to; but it is fair to assume that they will view the matter in the same light as the Tennessee court (supra), and hold that it is not a co-insurance clause, even though it generally produces the same result; that it contains no provision whatever requiring the insured to carry or procure a stated amount of insurance, and in event of failure, to become a co-insurer, but that it is simply a clause placing a limitation upon the insurer’s liability, which is expressly prohibited by statute. The fact that the insurers have labeled it “75% Co-insurance Clause” does not make it such.
It is, therefore, not at all surprising that the question is frequently asked as to the difference between the various forms of so-called co-insurance clauses, and these will be considered in the order in which, chronologically, they came into use.
Probably in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred there is no difference* between these clauses in the results obtained by their application, but cases occasionally arise where ac¬ cording to the generally accepted interpretation the difference will be quite pronounced. This difference, which will be hereinafter considered, appears in connecton with the old co-insurance clause and the percentage co-insurance clause, and only in cases where the policies are nonconcurrent.
The first of the four forms is the old co-insurance clause which for many years was the only one used in the West, and which is used there still, to some extent, and now quite generally in the South. Its reintroduction in the South was probably due to the Tennessee decision, to which reference has been made (supra). This clause provides that the insured shall maintain insurance on the property described in the policy to the extent of at least a stated percentage (usually 80%) of the actual cash value thereof, and failing so to do, shall to the extent of such deficit bear his, her or their pro¬ portion of any loss. It does not say that he shall maintain insurance on all of the property, and the prevailing opinion is that the co-insurance clause will be complied with if he carries the stipulated percentage of insurance either on all or on any part of the property described, notwithstanding the fact that a portion of said insurance may be of no assist¬ ance whatever to the blanket, or more general policy, as a contributing factor.

Grand Theft Auto IV The Complete Edition

Genres/Tags: Action (Shooter), 3rd Person, Open World, 3D
Companies: Rockstar North / Rockstar Games
Languages: RUS/ENG/MULTI7
Original Size: 25.6 GB
Repack Size: from 13.2 GB [Selective Download]

Grand Theft Auto IV  Fitgirl Repack Download PC Game

Grand Theft Auto IV Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install Grand Theft Auto IV Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download Grand Theft Auto IV  Fit girl repack is free to play the game. Yes you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download Grand Theft Auto IV  igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download Grand Theft Auto IV   Fitgirl awesome game.

Download Mirrors Grand Theft Auto IV

  • 1337x | [magnet] [.torrent file only]
  • RuTor [magnet]
  • Tapochek.net
  • Filehoster: MultiUpload (10+ hosters, interchangeable) [Use JDownloader2]
  • Filehoster: PixelDrain
  • Filehosters: Google Drive, OneDrive + others (Uploaded by crackhub213)
  • Filehoster: OneDrive (Uploaded by Gamesdrive, NOT compatible with other mirrors)

Repack Features

  • Based upon Rockstar Club version v1.2.0.43: 22.2 GB
  • Mr.Goldberg + Christsnatcher crack glued over
  • DXVK & DxWrapper ara available in “_Wrappers” folder for better game perfomance; more info on https://ant-sh.blogspot.com/2020/07/gta-4-stutter-choppiness-fix.html
  • Radio downgrader has Calcium (666 megabytes) added, which allows quick switching between older and new radio tracklists. See “Music Stations” of description for more information
  • Modifications to allow the use of only the original Vladivostok FM tracks in GTA4 instead of “combined with Episodes” tracklist This mod was added
  • GTAIV Vanilla Fixes v1.6.2 ModPack (2.7 GB) by GTAVI(CE) is now available as an additional download that includes a myriad of fixes and enhancements
  • 100% Lossless and MD5-perfect All files are identical to the originals following installation (when using the latest radio equipment and without modpack)
  • Nothing was ripped, nothing was re-encoded
  • Selective download feature: you could skip downloading and installing vanilla fixes ModPack. Radio stations with both versions (old and new) are available in the main archive of repacks
  • A significantly smaller size archive (compressed from the cumulative 25.6 up to 13.2/13.6 GB)
  • Installation time: 15 minutes for CPUs with 8 threads • 30 minutes for four-thread CPU
  • Check for integrity after-installation so that you can be sure everything was installed correctly
  • Storage space on the HDD following installation Up to 30.1 GB
  • You can modify the game’s the language using taking “commandline.txt” from correspoding subfolder of “_Language Changer” to the game root
  • Repack makes use of the XTool library provided by Razor12911.
  • Minimum 2GB of memory (inc. the virtual) needed to install this pack

Game Description

The standalone retail title tells three distinct stories interspersed to make some of the more original and enjoyable single-player experiences of the current generation.

This ultimate Grand Theft Auto bundle boasts hundreds of hours of single-player play as well as a variety of multiplayer game types that are open to all restricted only by the players’ imagination; and numerous radio stations, each with many hours of music, and original dialogue.

TROUBLESHOOTING Grand Theft Auto IV Fitgirl Repack Download

Also Read:

 

The Co-insurance Clause

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause

Of the more important clauses in current use, the one most frequently used, most severely criticized, most mis¬ understood, most legislated against, and withal the most reasonable and most equitable, is that which in general terms is known as the “co-insurance clause.”
Insurance is one of the great necessities of our business, social and economic life, and the expense of maintaining it should be distributed among the property owners of the country as equitably as it is humanly possible so to do.
Losses and expenses are paid out of premiums col¬ lected. When a loss is total the penalty for underinsurance falls where it properly belongs, on the insured who has elected to save premium and assume a portion of the risk himself, and the same penalty for underinsurance should by contract be made to apply in case of partial loss as applies automatically in case of total loss.
If all losses were total, liberality on the part of the insured in the payment of premium would bring its own reward, and parsimony would bring its own penalty; but the records of the leading companies show that of all the losses sustained, about 65%—numerically—are less than $100; about 30% are between $100 and total; and about 5% are total. The natural inclination, therefore, on the part of the public, particularly on the less hazardous risks, is to under¬ insure and take the chance of not having a total loss; and this will generally be done except under special conditions, or when reasonably full insurance must be carried to sustain credit or as collateral security for loans. There were several strik¬ ing illustrations of this in the San Francisco conflagration, where the amount of insurance carried on so-called fireproof buildings was less than 10% of their value, and the insured in such instances, of course, paid a heavy penalty for their neglect to carry adequate insurance.
Co-insurance operates only in case of partial loss, where both the insurance carried and the loss sustained are less than the prescribed percentage named in the clause, and has the effect of preventing one who has insured for a small percentage of value and paid a correspondingly small pre¬ mium from collecting as much in the event of loss as one who has insured for a large percentage of value and paid a correspondingly large premium. We have high authority for the principle,
“He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly, and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.”
and it should be applied to contracts of insurance. Rating systems may come, and rating systems may go; but, unless the principle of co-insurance be recognized and universally applied, there can be no equitable division of the insurance burden, and the existing inequalities will go on forever. The principle is so well established in some countries that the general foreign form of policy issued by the London offices for use therein contains the full co-insurance clause in the printed conditions.
The necessity for co-insurance as an equalizer of rates was quite forcibly illustrated by a prominent underwriter in an ad¬ dress delivered several years ago, in the following example involving two buildings of superior construction:
“A’S” BUILDING “B’S” BUILDING
Value $100,000 Value $100,000
Insurance 80,000 Insurance 10,000
Rate 1% Rate 1%
Premium received— Premium received—
one year, 800 one year, 100
No Co-insurance Clause No Co-insurance Clause
Loss 800 Loss 800
Loss Collectible 800 Loss Collectible 800
“B” pays only one-eighth as much premium as “A,” yet both collect the same amount of loss, and in the absence of co-insurance conditions both would collect the same amount in all instances where the loss is $10,000 or less. Of course, if the loss should exceed $10,000, “A” would reap his reward, and “B” would pay his penalty. This situation clearly calls either for a difference in rate in favor of “A” or for a difference in loss collection as against “B,” and the latter can be regulated only through the medium of a co-insurance condition in the policy.
At this point it may not be amiss incidentally to inquire why the owner of a building which is heavily encumbered, whose policies are payable to a mortgagee (particularly a junior encumbrancer) under a mortgagee clause, and where subrogation may be of little or no value, should have the benefit of the same rate as the owner of another building of similar construction with similar occupancy, but unencum¬ bered.
In some states rates are made with and without co- insurance conditions, quite a material reduction in the basis rate being allowed for the insertion of the 80% clause in the policy, and a further reduction for the use of the 90% and 100% clauses. This, however, does not go far enough, and any variation in rate should be graded according to the co-insurance percentage named in the clause, and this gradation should not be restricted, as it is, to 80%, 90% or 100%, if the principle of equalization is to be maintained.
Various clauses designed to give practical effect to the co-insurance principle have been in use in this country for nearly forty years in connection with fire and other contracts of insurance. Some of these are well adapted to the purpose intended, while others fail to accomplish said purpose under certain conditions; but, fortunately, incidents of this nature are not of frequent occurrence.
There are, generally speaking, four forms, which differ quite materially in phraseology, and sometimes differ in prac¬ tical application. These four clauses are: (1) the old co- insurance clause; (2) the percentage co-insurance clause; (3) the average clause; (4) the reduced rate contribution clause.
Until recently, underwriters were complacently using some of these titles indiscriminately in certain portions of the country, under the assumption that the clauses, although differently phrased, were in effect the same, but they were subjected to quite a rude awakening by a decision which was handed down about a year ago by the Tennessee Court of Civic Appeals. The law in Tennessee permits the use of the three-fourths value clause and the co-insurance clause, but permits no other restrictive provisions. The form in use bore the inscription “Co-insurance Clause,” but the context was the phraseology of the reduced rate contribution clause, and although the result was the same under the operation of either, the court held that the form used was not the co- insurance clause, hence it was void and consequently inop¬ erative. Thompson vs. Concordia Fire Ins. Co. (Tenn. 1919) 215 S.W. Rep. 932, 55 Ins. Law Journal 122.
The law of Georgia provides that all insurance companies shall pay the full amount of loss sustained up to the amount of insurance expressed in the policy, and that all stipulations in such policies to the contrary shall be null and void. The law further provides that when the insured has several policies on the same property, his recovery from any company will be pro rata as to the amount thereof.
About twenty years ago, the Supreipe Court of Georgia was called upon to decide whether under the law referred to the old co-insurance clause then in use, which provided
“that the assured shall at all times maintain a total insurance upon the property insured by this policy of not less than 75% of the actual cash value thereof . . . . and that failing to do so, the assured shall
become a co-insurer to the extent of the deficiency,”
was valid and enforceable, and it decided that the clause was not violative of the law. Pekor vs. Fireman’s Fund Ins. Co. (1898) (106 Ga. page 1)

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause
The court evidently construed the clause as a binding agreement on the part of the insured to secure insurance up to a certain percentage of value, and virtually held that if the insured himself desired to take the place of another insurance company he was at liberty to do so as one way of fulfilling his agreement.

The Georgia courts, however, have not passed upon the validity of the reduced rate contribution clause in connection with the statutory law above referred to; but it is fair to assume that they will view the matter in the same light as the Tennessee court (supra), and hold that it is not a co-insurance clause, even though it generally produces the same result; that it contains no provision whatever requiring the insured to carry or procure a stated amount of insurance, and in event of failure, to become a co-insurer, but that it is simply a clause placing a limitation upon the insurer’s liability, which is expressly prohibited by statute. The fact that the insurers have labeled it “75% Co-insurance Clause” does not make it such.
It is, therefore, not at all surprising that the question is frequently asked as to the difference between the various forms of so-called co-insurance clauses, and these will be considered in the order in which, chronologically, they came into use.
Probably in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred there is no difference* between these clauses in the results obtained by their application, but cases occasionally arise where ac¬ cording to the generally accepted interpretation the difference will be quite pronounced. This difference, which will be hereinafter considered, appears in connecton with the old co-insurance clause and the percentage co-insurance clause, and only in cases where the policies are nonconcurrent.
The first of the four forms is the old co-insurance clause which for many years was the only one used in the West, and which is used there still, to some extent, and now quite generally in the South. Its reintroduction in the South was probably due to the Tennessee decision, to which reference has been made (supra). This clause provides that the insured shall maintain insurance on the property described in the policy to the extent of at least a stated percentage (usually 80%) of the actual cash value thereof, and failing so to do, shall to the extent of such deficit bear his, her or their pro¬ portion of any loss. It does not say that he shall maintain insurance on all of the property, and the prevailing opinion is that the co-insurance clause will be complied with if he carries the stipulated percentage of insurance either on all or on any part of the property described, notwithstanding the fact that a portion of said insurance may be of no assist¬ ance whatever to the blanket, or more general policy, as a contributing factor.

The Pedestrian Fitgirl Repack

Genres/Tags: Logic, Puzzle, Side, 2D, 3D
Company: Skookum Arts
Languages: ENG
Original Size: 914 MB
Repack Size: 565 MB

The Pedestrian Fitgirl Repack Download PC Game

The Pedestrian Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install The Pedestrian Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download The Pedestrian  Fit girl repack is free to play the game. Yes you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download The Pedestrian  igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download The Pedestrian  Fitgirl awesome game.

Download Mirrors The Pedestrian Fitgirl Repack

  • 1337x | KAT [magnet] [.torrent file only]
  • RuTor [magnet]
  • Tapochek.net
  • Filehoster: MultiUpload (10+ hosters, interchangeable) [Use JDownloader2]
  • Filehosters: Google Drive + 2 (Uploaded by Uria Urikra and hermietkreeft, compatible with torrent)
  • Filehosters: DropArk + NitroFlare + MegaUp (Uploaded by Vikky793, not compatible with torrent)

Repack Features

  • Based on The_Pedestrian-HOODLUM ISO release: hlm-thepedestrian.iso (958,625,792 bytes)
  • Completely Lossless and MD5 Complete: All files are identical to the original after installation
  • Absolutely nothing was copied, not a single thing was changed.
  • A significantly smaller size archive (compressed by 914 to 565MB)
  • Installation can take one minute.
  • Check for integrity after-installation so you can be sure everything was installed correctly
  • HDD space after installation: 2 GB
  • A minimum of 2GB of memory (inc. Virtual) needed to install this pack

Game Description

The Pedestrian is an 2.5D Side Scrolling Puzzle Platformer. You are The Pedestrian! Step into a vibrant 3D world that is filled with stunning graphics and complex puzzles.

The game involves changing the arrangement and connecting of public signs to discover and progress through each exciting setting.

TROUBLESHOOTING The Pedestrian Fitgirl Repack Download

Also Read:

The Co-insurance Clause

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause

Of the more important clauses in current use, the one most frequently used, most severely criticized, most mis¬ understood, most legislated against, and withal the most reasonable and most equitable, is that which in general terms is known as the “co-insurance clause.”
Insurance is one of the great necessities of our business, social and economic life, and the expense of maintaining it should be distributed among the property owners of the country as equitably as it is humanly possible so to do.
Losses and expenses are paid out of premiums col¬ lected. When a loss is total the penalty for underinsurance falls where it properly belongs, on the insured who has elected to save premium and assume a portion of the risk himself, and the same penalty for underinsurance should by contract be made to apply in case of partial loss as applies automatically in case of total loss.
If all losses were total, liberality on the part of the insured in the payment of premium would bring its own reward, and parsimony would bring its own penalty; but the records of the leading companies show that of all the losses sustained, about 65%—numerically—are less than $100; about 30% are between $100 and total; and about 5% are total. The natural inclination, therefore, on the part of the public, particularly on the less hazardous risks, is to under¬ insure and take the chance of not having a total loss; and this will generally be done except under special conditions, or when reasonably full insurance must be carried to sustain credit or as collateral security for loans. There were several strik¬ ing illustrations of this in the San Francisco conflagration, where the amount of insurance carried on so-called fireproof buildings was less than 10% of their value, and the insured in such instances, of course, paid a heavy penalty for their neglect to carry adequate insurance.
Co-insurance operates only in case of partial loss, where both the insurance carried and the loss sustained are less than the prescribed percentage named in the clause, and has the effect of preventing one who has insured for a small percentage of value and paid a correspondingly small pre¬ mium from collecting as much in the event of loss as one who has insured for a large percentage of value and paid a correspondingly large premium. We have high authority for the principle,
“He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly, and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.”
and it should be applied to contracts of insurance. Rating systems may come, and rating systems may go; but, unless the principle of co-insurance be recognized and universally applied, there can be no equitable division of the insurance burden, and the existing inequalities will go on forever. The principle is so well established in some countries that the general foreign form of policy issued by the London offices for use therein contains the full co-insurance clause in the printed conditions.
The necessity for co-insurance as an equalizer of rates was quite forcibly illustrated by a prominent underwriter in an ad¬ dress delivered several years ago, in the following example involving two buildings of superior construction:
“A’S” BUILDING “B’S” BUILDING
Value $100,000 Value $100,000
Insurance 80,000 Insurance 10,000
Rate 1% Rate 1%
Premium received— Premium received—
one year, 800 one year, 100
No Co-insurance Clause No Co-insurance Clause
Loss 800 Loss 800
Loss Collectible 800 Loss Collectible 800
“B” pays only one-eighth as much premium as “A,” yet both collect the same amount of loss, and in the absence of co-insurance conditions both would collect the same amount in all instances where the loss is $10,000 or less. Of course, if the loss should exceed $10,000, “A” would reap his reward, and “B” would pay his penalty. This situation clearly calls either for a difference in rate in favor of “A” or for a difference in loss collection as against “B,” and the latter can be regulated only through the medium of a co-insurance condition in the policy.
At this point it may not be amiss incidentally to inquire why the owner of a building which is heavily encumbered, whose policies are payable to a mortgagee (particularly a junior encumbrancer) under a mortgagee clause, and where subrogation may be of little or no value, should have the benefit of the same rate as the owner of another building of similar construction with similar occupancy, but unencum¬ bered.
In some states rates are made with and without co- insurance conditions, quite a material reduction in the basis rate being allowed for the insertion of the 80% clause in the policy, and a further reduction for the use of the 90% and 100% clauses. This, however, does not go far enough, and any variation in rate should be graded according to the co-insurance percentage named in the clause, and this gradation should not be restricted, as it is, to 80%, 90% or 100%, if the principle of equalization is to be maintained.
Various clauses designed to give practical effect to the co-insurance principle have been in use in this country for nearly forty years in connection with fire and other contracts of insurance. Some of these are well adapted to the purpose intended, while others fail to accomplish said purpose under certain conditions; but, fortunately, incidents of this nature are not of frequent occurrence.
There are, generally speaking, four forms, which differ quite materially in phraseology, and sometimes differ in prac¬ tical application. These four clauses are: (1) the old co- insurance clause; (2) the percentage co-insurance clause; (3) the average clause; (4) the reduced rate contribution clause.
Until recently, underwriters were complacently using some of these titles indiscriminately in certain portions of the country, under the assumption that the clauses, although differently phrased, were in effect the same, but they were subjected to quite a rude awakening by a decision which was handed down about a year ago by the Tennessee Court of Civic Appeals. The law in Tennessee permits the use of the three-fourths value clause and the co-insurance clause, but permits no other restrictive provisions. The form in use bore the inscription “Co-insurance Clause,” but the context was the phraseology of the reduced rate contribution clause, and although the result was the same under the operation of either, the court held that the form used was not the co- insurance clause, hence it was void and consequently inop¬ erative. Thompson vs. Concordia Fire Ins. Co. (Tenn. 1919) 215 S.W. Rep. 932, 55 Ins. Law Journal 122.
The law of Georgia provides that all insurance companies shall pay the full amount of loss sustained up to the amount of insurance expressed in the policy, and that all stipulations in such policies to the contrary shall be null and void. The law further provides that when the insured has several policies on the same property, his recovery from any company will be pro rata as to the amount thereof.
About twenty years ago, the Supreipe Court of Georgia was called upon to decide whether under the law referred to the old co-insurance clause then in use, which provided
“that the assured shall at all times maintain a total insurance upon the property insured by this policy of not less than 75% of the actual cash value thereof . . . . and that failing to do so, the assured shall
become a co-insurer to the extent of the deficiency,”
was valid and enforceable, and it decided that the clause was not violative of the law. Pekor vs. Fireman’s Fund Ins. Co. (1898) (106 Ga. page 1)

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause
The court evidently construed the clause as a binding agreement on the part of the insured to secure insurance up to a certain percentage of value, and virtually held that if the insured himself desired to take the place of another insurance company he was at liberty to do so as one way of fulfilling his agreement.

The Georgia courts, however, have not passed upon the validity of the reduced rate contribution clause in connection with the statutory law above referred to; but it is fair to assume that they will view the matter in the same light as the Tennessee court (supra), and hold that it is not a co-insurance clause, even though it generally produces the same result; that it contains no provision whatever requiring the insured to carry or procure a stated amount of insurance, and in event of failure, to become a co-insurer, but that it is simply a clause placing a limitation upon the insurer’s liability, which is expressly prohibited by statute. The fact that the insurers have labeled it “75% Co-insurance Clause” does not make it such.
It is, therefore, not at all surprising that the question is frequently asked as to the difference between the various forms of so-called co-insurance clauses, and these will be considered in the order in which, chronologically, they came into use.
Probably in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred there is no difference* between these clauses in the results obtained by their application, but cases occasionally arise where ac¬ cording to the generally accepted interpretation the difference will be quite pronounced. This difference, which will be hereinafter considered, appears in connecton with the old co-insurance clause and the percentage co-insurance clause, and only in cases where the policies are nonconcurrent.
The first of the four forms is the old co-insurance clause which for many years was the only one used in the West, and which is used there still, to some extent, and now quite generally in the South. Its reintroduction in the South was probably due to the Tennessee decision, to which reference has been made (supra). This clause provides that the insured shall maintain insurance on the property described in the policy to the extent of at least a stated percentage (usually 80%) of the actual cash value thereof, and failing so to do, shall to the extent of such deficit bear his, her or their pro¬ portion of any loss. It does not say that he shall maintain insurance on all of the property, and the prevailing opinion is that the co-insurance clause will be complied with if he carries the stipulated percentage of insurance either on all or on any part of the property described, notwithstanding the fact that a portion of said insurance may be of no assist¬ ance whatever to the blanket, or more general policy, as a contributing factor.

The Coma 2 Vicious Sisters Firgirl Repack

Genres/Tags: Adventure, Side, 2D
Companies: Devespresso Games, Headup Games
Languages: RUS/ENG/MULTI8
Original Size: 1.9 GB
Repack Size: from 894 MB [Selective Download]

The Coma 2 Vicious Sisters Fitgirl Repack Download PC Game

The Coma 2 Vicious Sister Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install The Coma 2 Vicious Sister Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download The Coma 2 Vicious Sister Fit girl repack is free to play the game. Yes you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download The Coma 2 Vicious Sister  igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download The Coma 2 Vicious Sister  Fitgirl awesome game.

Download Mirrors The Coma 2 Vicious Sisters

  • 1337x | KAT [magnet] [.torrent file only]
  • RuTor [magnet]
  • Tapochek.net
  • Filehoster: MultiUpload (10+ hosters, interchangeable) [Use JDownloader2]
  • Filehosters: Google Drive + 2 (Uploaded by Uria Urikra and hermietkreeft, compatible with torrent)
  • Filehosters: DropArk + NitroFlare + MegaUp (Uploaded by Vikky793, not compatible with torrent)

Repack Features

  • Based on The.Coma.2.Vicious.Sisters-PLAZA ISO release: plaza-the.coma.2.vicious.sisters.iso (1,698,103,296 bytes)
  • The.Coma.2.Vicious.Sisters.DLC.Pack-PLAZA (262 MB) and The.Coma.2.Vicious.Sisters.Update.v1.0.1-PLAZA (45 MB) are applied over
  • Two DLCs (Mina – Locks of Love Skin and Winter Princess Skin) + Bonus Content (ArtBook + OST) are included and activated
  • 100% lossless and MD5 Complete: All files are exactly like the originals after installation
  • Absolutely nothing was copied, not a single thing was changed.
  • Selective Download Repack: you can avoid downloading and installing of bonus content
  • A significantly smaller size archive (compressed from total 1.9 1 GB to 894 MB/1 1 GB)
  • Installation can take approximately 3-6 minutes (depending on the system you have installed and other components)
  • Check for integrity after-installation so that you can ensure that everything is installed correctly
  • Storage space on the HDD following installation as much as 3GB (4 GB at the time of installation)
  • Language settings can be changed within game settings.
  • A minimum of 2GB of memory (inc. the virtual) is required to install this pack

Game Description

The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters is a thrilling, narrative-driven game. Get lost in the twisted Sehwa area as you meet an intriguing collection of characters, work through puzzles, find clues and fight against a ruthless psycho.

Heroes, who are forced to face their most dreadful fears, seldom escape without injury. Through the tale, Mina will encounter dangerous situations that could cause her to be permanently damaged. Create items to be aware of the dangers ahead to prevent harm. Dark Song is now more terrifying and powerful like never before. If you fall into her clutches, it could result in instant death. The speed you run and the flashlight you carry could make you an easy to be a target. You must be careful to manage the pressure of exploration with your necessity to survive!

TROUBLESHOOTING Fitgirl Repack Download

Also Read:

The Co-insurance Clause

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause

Of the more important clauses in current use, the one most frequently used, most severely criticized, most mis¬ understood, most legislated against, and withal the most reasonable and most equitable, is that which in general terms is known as the “co-insurance clause.”
Insurance is one of the great necessities of our business, social and economic life, and the expense of maintaining it should be distributed among the property owners of the country as equitably as it is humanly possible so to do.
Losses and expenses are paid out of premiums col¬ lected. When a loss is total the penalty for underinsurance falls where it properly belongs, on the insured who has elected to save premium and assume a portion of the risk himself, and the same penalty for underinsurance should by contract be made to apply in case of partial loss as applies automatically in case of total loss.
If all losses were total, liberality on the part of the insured in the payment of premium would bring its own reward, and parsimony would bring its own penalty; but the records of the leading companies show that of all the losses sustained, about 65%—numerically—are less than $100; about 30% are between $100 and total; and about 5% are total. The natural inclination, therefore, on the part of the public, particularly on the less hazardous risks, is to under¬ insure and take the chance of not having a total loss; and this will generally be done except under special conditions, or when reasonably full insurance must be carried to sustain credit or as collateral security for loans. There were several strik¬ ing illustrations of this in the San Francisco conflagration, where the amount of insurance carried on so-called fireproof buildings was less than 10% of their value, and the insured in such instances, of course, paid a heavy penalty for their neglect to carry adequate insurance.
Co-insurance operates only in case of partial loss, where both the insurance carried and the loss sustained are less than the prescribed percentage named in the clause, and has the effect of preventing one who has insured for a small percentage of value and paid a correspondingly small pre¬ mium from collecting as much in the event of loss as one who has insured for a large percentage of value and paid a correspondingly large premium. We have high authority for the principle,
“He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly, and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.”
and it should be applied to contracts of insurance. Rating systems may come, and rating systems may go; but, unless the principle of co-insurance be recognized and universally applied, there can be no equitable division of the insurance burden, and the existing inequalities will go on forever. The principle is so well established in some countries that the general foreign form of policy issued by the London offices for use therein contains the full co-insurance clause in the printed conditions.
The necessity for co-insurance as an equalizer of rates was quite forcibly illustrated by a prominent underwriter in an ad¬ dress delivered several years ago, in the following example involving two buildings of superior construction:
“A’S” BUILDING “B’S” BUILDING
Value $100,000 Value $100,000
Insurance 80,000 Insurance 10,000
Rate 1% Rate 1%
Premium received— Premium received—
one year, 800 one year, 100
No Co-insurance Clause No Co-insurance Clause
Loss 800 Loss 800
Loss Collectible 800 Loss Collectible 800
“B” pays only one-eighth as much premium as “A,” yet both collect the same amount of loss, and in the absence of co-insurance conditions both would collect the same amount in all instances where the loss is $10,000 or less. Of course, if the loss should exceed $10,000, “A” would reap his reward, and “B” would pay his penalty. This situation clearly calls either for a difference in rate in favor of “A” or for a difference in loss collection as against “B,” and the latter can be regulated only through the medium of a co-insurance condition in the policy.
At this point it may not be amiss incidentally to inquire why the owner of a building which is heavily encumbered, whose policies are payable to a mortgagee (particularly a junior encumbrancer) under a mortgagee clause, and where subrogation may be of little or no value, should have the benefit of the same rate as the owner of another building of similar construction with similar occupancy, but unencum¬ bered.
In some states rates are made with and without co- insurance conditions, quite a material reduction in the basis rate being allowed for the insertion of the 80% clause in the policy, and a further reduction for the use of the 90% and 100% clauses. This, however, does not go far enough, and any variation in rate should be graded according to the co-insurance percentage named in the clause, and this gradation should not be restricted, as it is, to 80%, 90% or 100%, if the principle of equalization is to be maintained.
Various clauses designed to give practical effect to the co-insurance principle have been in use in this country for nearly forty years in connection with fire and other contracts of insurance. Some of these are well adapted to the purpose intended, while others fail to accomplish said purpose under certain conditions; but, fortunately, incidents of this nature are not of frequent occurrence.
There are, generally speaking, four forms, which differ quite materially in phraseology, and sometimes differ in prac¬ tical application. These four clauses are: (1) the old co- insurance clause; (2) the percentage co-insurance clause; (3) the average clause; (4) the reduced rate contribution clause.
Until recently, underwriters were complacently using some of these titles indiscriminately in certain portions of the country, under the assumption that the clauses, although differently phrased, were in effect the same, but they were subjected to quite a rude awakening by a decision which was handed down about a year ago by the Tennessee Court of Civic Appeals. The law in Tennessee permits the use of the three-fourths value clause and the co-insurance clause, but permits no other restrictive provisions. The form in use bore the inscription “Co-insurance Clause,” but the context was the phraseology of the reduced rate contribution clause, and although the result was the same under the operation of either, the court held that the form used was not the co- insurance clause, hence it was void and consequently inop¬ erative. Thompson vs. Concordia Fire Ins. Co. (Tenn. 1919) 215 S.W. Rep. 932, 55 Ins. Law Journal 122.
The law of Georgia provides that all insurance companies shall pay the full amount of loss sustained up to the amount of insurance expressed in the policy, and that all stipulations in such policies to the contrary shall be null and void. The law further provides that when the insured has several policies on the same property, his recovery from any company will be pro rata as to the amount thereof.
About twenty years ago, the Supreipe Court of Georgia was called upon to decide whether under the law referred to the old co-insurance clause then in use, which provided
“that the assured shall at all times maintain a total insurance upon the property insured by this policy of not less than 75% of the actual cash value thereof . . . . and that failing to do so, the assured shall
become a co-insurer to the extent of the deficiency,”
was valid and enforceable, and it decided that the clause was not violative of the law. Pekor vs. Fireman’s Fund Ins. Co. (1898) (106 Ga. page 1)

The Co-insurance Clause
The Co-insurance Clause
The court evidently construed the clause as a binding agreement on the part of the insured to secure insurance up to a certain percentage of value, and virtually held that if the insured himself desired to take the place of another insurance company he was at liberty to do so as one way of fulfilling his agreement.

The Georgia courts, however, have not passed upon the validity of the reduced rate contribution clause in connection with the statutory law above referred to; but it is fair to assume that they will view the matter in the same light as the Tennessee court (supra), and hold that it is not a co-insurance clause, even though it generally produces the same result; that it contains no provision whatever requiring the insured to carry or procure a stated amount of insurance, and in event of failure, to become a co-insurer, but that it is simply a clause placing a limitation upon the insurer’s liability, which is expressly prohibited by statute. The fact that the insurers have labeled it “75% Co-insurance Clause” does not make it such.
It is, therefore, not at all surprising that the question is frequently asked as to the difference between the various forms of so-called co-insurance clauses, and these will be considered in the order in which, chronologically, they came into use.
Probably in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred there is no difference* between these clauses in the results obtained by their application, but cases occasionally arise where ac¬ cording to the generally accepted interpretation the difference will be quite pronounced. This difference, which will be hereinafter considered, appears in connecton with the old co-insurance clause and the percentage co-insurance clause, and only in cases where the policies are nonconcurrent.
The first of the four forms is the old co-insurance clause which for many years was the only one used in the West, and which is used there still, to some extent, and now quite generally in the South. Its reintroduction in the South was probably due to the Tennessee decision, to which reference has been made (supra). This clause provides that the insured shall maintain insurance on the property described in the policy to the extent of at least a stated percentage (usually 80%) of the actual cash value thereof, and failing so to do, shall to the extent of such deficit bear his, her or their pro¬ portion of any loss. It does not say that he shall maintain insurance on all of the property, and the prevailing opinion is that the co-insurance clause will be complied with if he carries the stipulated percentage of insurance either on all or on any part of the property described, notwithstanding the fact that a portion of said insurance may be of no assist¬ ance whatever to the blanket, or more general policy, as a contributing factor.