Category Archives: Update

Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Download

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Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Fit girl repack is a free to play the game. Yes, you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 igg games an ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download this awesome game.

Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 for Android and iOS?

Yes, you can download Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 on your Android and iOS platform and again they are also free to download.

Also Read:

How To download and Install Stoneshard 0.5.7.15

Now to download and Install Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 for free on your PC you have to follow below-given steps. If there is a problem then you can comment down below in the comment section we will love to help you on this.

  1. First, you have to download Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 on your PC. You can find the download button at the top of the post.
  2. Now the download page will open. There you have to log in. Once you login the download process will start automatically.
  3. If you are unable to Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Download game then make sure you have deactivated your Adblocker. Otherwise, you will not be able to Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Downloadgame on to your PC.
  4. Now if you want to watch the Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Download game Installation video and Troubleshooting tutorial then head over to the next section.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Screenshots  (Tap To Enlarge)

 Now if you are interested in the screenshots then tap down on the picture to enlarge them.

 

Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 Gameplay and Review

We’re gonna be taking a look at two different Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 download here one from April of 1979 it’s a bit before my time But I’m intrigued by a lot of the stuff that is probably going to be in here I say probably because I’m looking through these yet and then also this one here that I’m much more nostalgic for Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 update download I remember it is the RadioShack Christmas catalog December of 1991 and let’s go ahead and dive into this because I find this to be insanely intriguing For a couple of reasons one to get some sort of first-hand knowledge of what some of these items cost and how they were Advertising them which oddly enough can be very much lost a time Especially for these kinds of circulars and ads and flyers and things that you would see that were either sent directly to people in the mailbox which I believe these were and Also, they were just stuck into the middle like an insert inside of newspapers during Sundays. There are very few archives of them online so Anytime that I find them like in a bundle on eBay or whatever?

I buy them, so let’s look through them and hope to we find something interesting in here RadioShack kind of sad that they’re gone the last one finally closed recently nearby and I’ve already missed them a little bit because sometimes you just needed a weird thing and they had it anyway I’m sure we’re gonna be seeing plenty of weird things in here Let’s get right to it starting with the Chairman’s thoughts as is their largest sales flyer of the year.

That’s nice And he’s pushing this Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 igg games It’s almost that way It was a thousand dollars And then as $8.99 for a pretty sleek looking video VHS camcorder the world’s smallest and lightest full-size one apparently sweet stuff that would have been awesome in 91 and of course a. Very fond memories of these clear phones I had one of these seems as everyone did at one point or another there was just a lot of clear electronics and 90’s period Game boys and consoles and phones and just everything calculators, whatever So we have some spectacular gifts from our video. Shaq a lot of Memorex gifts apparently Memorex Memorex memorized Memorex this one’s awesome 400 bucks auto head cleaning Plus MTS stereo and broadcasts And I’ve seen like these stacked up and Goodwill’s fraud like a dollar And yeah some realistic thingies in here too and mixed in between the Memorex realistic was their in-house brand in case you’re not aware So yea RadioShack had their cheaper alternatives like these here’s a little pocket color TV I never actually knew anyone that had one of those, but I would think they were extremely cool.

They were definitely a central place to go for audio programmable portable CD player They’re 420 bucks not bad was $179 and what is what the as seen on TV here as seen on TV see on TV What TV station was putting these? Yeah well? Now here we go some high five stacks and Assorted things that the while these aren’t the greatest ones these are all realistic brands, not anything that I would necessarily go for nowadays even Though they look aesthetically very pleasing.

I got to love the woodgrain everything seems like everyone had one I don’t remember why It was always there it was like stack things and components And he had some big Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 free download speakers that were too big for we never played music that loud we had giant speakers anyway And you know glass on the front there which was sweet. I just like moving that glass door RadioShack gifts for people on the go, yes Stoneshard 0.5.7.15 sold radios. They were a shack for radios.

Yeah, we got CB radios stereo cassettes walkie-talkies shortwave radios Some other crap this one’s ridiculously expensive. What is that 2 meter VHF FM ham transceiver? Goodness, and we have a nice deal on the pull out here.

The Insurance Society of New York

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

The subject of insurance forms is such an exceedingly broad one, that it will be impossible in an address such as this to do more than touch upon it in a general way, and direct attention to some of the more important forms, which, although in general use, may possess features which are not fully understood.
The best form, whether viewed from the standpoint of the insurance company or the insured, is a fair form, one which expresses in clear, unambiguous language the mutual intention of the parties, and affords no cause for surprise on the part of either, after a loss has occurred. But the prepara¬ tion of such a form is not always an easy task, and it is right at this point that the ability of the broker and the underwriter come into play.
A distinguished Englishman declared that the English Constitution was the greatest production that had ever been conceived by the brain of man, but it was subjected to the most scathing criticism and violent assaults by Bentham, the great subversive critic of English law. Twenty-five years ago the New York Standard Policy was prepared by the best legal and lay talent in the insurance, world, and the greatest care was taken to present not only a reasonable and fair form of contract between the insurer and the insured, but one which could be easily read and understood.
While no such extravagant claims have been made for the Standard Policy as were made for the “Matchless Con-maximum of loss collection with a minimum of co-insurance or other resistance than a present day broker, he has not yet been discovered.
The ornate policies in use thirty years ago, with no uniformity in conditions, with their classification of hazards which no one could understand and their fine print which few could read, have given way to plainly printed uniform Standard Policies with materially simplified conditions. But the written portion of the insurance contract owing to our commercial and industrial growth, instead of becoming more simple, has taken exactly the opposite direction, and we now have covering under a single policy or set of policies, the entire property of a coal and mining company, the breweries, public service or traction lines of a whole city and the fixed property, rolling stock and common carrier liability of an entire railroad system involving millions of dollars and con¬ taining items numbering into the thousands. This forcibly illustrates the evolution of the policy form since the issue of the first fire insurance contract by an American company one hundred and sixty years ago, in favor of a gentleman bearing the familiar name of John Smith, covering
“500 £ on his dwelling house on the east side of King Street, between Mulberry and Sassafras, 30 feet front, 40 feet deep, brick, 9-inch party walls, three stories in height, plas¬ tered partitions, open newel bracket stairs, pent houses with board ceilings, garrets finished, three stories, painted brick kitchen, two stories in height, 15 feet 9 inches front, 19 feet 6 inches deep, dresser, shelves, wainscot closet fronts, shingling 1-5 worn.”
It will be observed that in the matter of verbiage this primitive form rivals some of our present day household furniture forms and all will agree that this particular dwelling might have been covered just as effectually and identified quite as easily without such an elaborate description.
Any one who has an insurable interest in property should be permitted to have any form of contract that he is willing to pay for, provided it is not contrary to law or against public policy, and judging from a contract of insurance issued by a certain office not long ago the insuring public apparently has no difficulty in securing any kind of a policy it may desire at any price it may be willing to pay. The contract in ques¬ tion was one for £20,000, covering stock against loss from any cause, except theft on the part of employes, anywhere in the Western Hemisphere, on land or water, without any con¬ ditions, restrictions or limitations whatsoever, written at less than one-half the Exchange rate in the insured’s place of business. An insurance agent upon being asked whether he thought it was good, said that if the company was anywhere near as good as the form, it was all that could be desired, but vouchsafed the opinion that it looked altogether too good to be good.

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

In these days we frequently find concentrated within the walls of a single structure one set of fire insurance policies covering on building, another on leasehold interest, another on rents or rental value—and in addition to this, policies for various tenants covering stock, fixtures, improvements, profits and use and occupancy, subject to the 100% average or co-insurance clause, to say nothing of steam boiler, casualty and liability insurance, thereby entirely eliminating the ele¬ ment of personal risk on the part of the owners, and produc¬ ing a situation which will account in some measure for the 17,000 annual fire alarms and $15,000,000 fire loss in New York City; $230,000,000 annual fire loss in the country at large, and for the constantly increasing percentage of cases where there are two or more fires in the same building and two or more claims from the same claimant.
The most common and perhaps least understood phrase found in policies of fire insurance is what is known as the “Commission Clause,” which reads “his own or held by him in trust or on commission or sold but not delivered” or “re¬ moved.” This clause in one form or another has been in use for many years, and it was originally the impression of un¬ derwriters that owing to the personal nature of the insurance contract a policy thus worded would simply cover the prop¬ erty of the insured and his interest in the property of others, such as advances and storage charges, but the courts have disabused their minds of any such narrow interpretation and have placed such a liberal construction upon the words “held in trust” that they may be justly regarded as among the broadest in the insurance language and scarcely less com¬ prehensive than the familiar term “for account of whom it may concern”; in fact, the principles controlling one phrase are similar to those governing the other.
It has been held that whether a merchant or bailee has assumed responsibility, or agreed to keep the property cov¬ ered or whether he is legally liable or not, if his policies contain the words “held in trust,” the owner may, after a fire, by merely ratifying the insurance of the bailee, appro¬ priate that for which he paid nothing whatever and may file proofs and bring suit in his own name against the bailee’s insurers. Nor is this all, for in some jurisdictions, if the bailee fails to include the loss on property of the bailor in his claim against his insurers, or if he does include it and the amount of insurance collectible is less than the total loss, the bailee may not first reimburse himself for the loss on his own goods and hold the balance in trust for the owners, but must prorate the amount actually collected with those own¬ ers who may have adopted the insurance, although, if he has a lien on any of the goods for charges or advances, this may be deducted from the proportion of insurance money due such owners The phrase “for account of whom it may concern” was formerly confined almost entirely to marine insurance, but in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to intro¬ duce it into policies of fire insurance.
All authorities are agreed that the interests protected by a policy containing these words must have been within the contemplation of him who took out the policy at the time it was issued. It is not necessary that he should have in¬ tended it for the benefit of some then known and particular individuals, but it would include such classes of persons as were intended to be included and who these were may be shown by parol. The owners or others intended to be cov¬ ered may ratify the insurance after a loss and take the bene¬ fit of it, though ignorant of its existence at the time of the issuance of the policy, just the same as under the term “held in trust.”
The words “for account of whom it may concern” are not limited in their protection to those persons who were concerned at the time the insurance was taken out, but will protect those having an insurable interest and who are con¬ cerned at the time when the loss occurs. They will cover the interest of a subsequent purchaser of a part or the whole of the property and supersede the alienation clause of the policy (U. S. S. C.), Hagan and Martin vs. Scottish Union and National Ins. Co., 32 Ins. Law Journal, p. 47; 186 U. S. 423).
A contract of insurance written in the name of “John Doe & Co. for account of whom it may concern” should contain a clause reading “Loss, if any, to be adjusted with and payable to John Doe & Co.,” not “loss, if any, payable to them” or “loss, if any, payable to the assured,” as forms sometimes read.
Policies are frequently written in the name of a bailee covering “On merchandise, his own and on the property of others for which he is responsible,” or “for which he may be liable”—and it has been held that’the effect of these words is to limit the liability of the insurer to the loss on the assured’s own goods and to his legal liability for loss on goods belonging to others, but the words “for which they are or may be liable” have been passed upon by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and they have been given an entirely dif¬ ferent interpretation. That tribunal in the case of The Home Insurance Company vs. Peoria & Pekin Union Railway Co. (28 Insurance Law Journal, p. 289; 178 Ills. 64) decided that the words quoted were merely descriptive of the cars to be insured; that the word “liable” as used in the policy did not signify a perfected or fixed legal liability, but rather a con¬ dition out of which a legal liability might arise.
As illustrative of its position the court said that an assignor of a negotiable note may, with no incorrectness of speech, be said to be liable upon his assignment obligation is not an absolute fixed legal liability but is con¬ tingent upon the financial condition of the maker; and ac¬ cordingly held that the insurance company was liable for loss on all the cars in the possession of the railroad company, notwithstanding the fact that the latter was not legally liable to the owners.
In view of the exceedingly broad construction which the courts have placed upon the time honored and familiar phrases to which reference has been made, it is important for the party insured, whether it be a railroad or other transportation company, a warehouseman, a laundryman, a tailor, a com¬ mission merchant or other bailee, to determine before the fire whether he desires the insurance to be so broad in its cover as to embrace not only his own property and interest, but also the property of everybody else which may happen to be in his custody; if so, he should be careful to insure for a sufficiently large amount to meet all possible co-insurance conditions,, and if he wishes to make sure of being fully reimbursed for his own loss, his only safe course is to insure for the full value of all the property in his possession.
At this point the inquiry which naturally presents itself is, how should a policy be written if a merchant, warehouse¬ man or other bailee desires to protect his own interest but not the interest of any one else? The following form is suggested: “On merchandise his own, and on his interest in and on his legal liability for property held by him in trust or on commission or on joint account with others, or sold but not removed, or on storage or for repairs, while con¬ tained, etc.” This will, it is believed, limit the operation of co-insurance conditions and at the same time prevent the owners from adopting, appropriating or helping themselves to the bailee’s insurance, for which they pay nothing and to which they are not equitably entitled.
Many of the household furniture forms now in use, in addition to embracing almost every conceivable kind of per¬ sonal property except that specifically prohibited by the pol¬ icy conditions, are also made to cover similar property be¬ longing to any member of the family or household, visitors, guests and servants.
This form would seem to indicate considerable ingenu¬ ity on the part of the broker, broad liberality on the part of the insurance company and commendable generosity on the part of the insured, and the latter would probably feel more than compensated by being able to reimburse his guest for any fire damage he might sustain while enjoying his hospi¬ tality, but the amount of insurance carried under such a form should anticipate the possibility of his having a number of guests at one time and a corresponding increase in the value at risk.
It must be borne in mind that in localities where co- insurance conditions prevail the value of property belonging

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FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Fit girl repack is a free to play the game. Yes, you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 igg games an ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download this awesome game.

FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 for Android and iOS?

Yes, you can download SKATE 3 on your Android and iOS platform and again they are also free to download.

Also Read:

How To download and Install FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20

Now to download and Install FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 for free on your PC you have to follow below-given steps. If there is a problem then you can comment down below in the comment section we will love to help you on this.

  1. First, you have to download FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 on your PC. You can find the download button at the top of the post.
  2. Now the download page will open. There you have to log in. Once you login the download process will start automatically.
  3. If you are unable to FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Download game then make sure you have deactivated your Adblocker. Otherwise, you will not be able to download this game on to your PC.
  4. Now if you want to watch the game Installation video and Troubleshooting tutorial then head over to the next section.

TROUBLESHOOTING FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Download

Screenshots  (Tap To Enlarge)

 Now if you are interested in the screenshots then tap down on the picture to enlarge them.

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FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 Download
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 This was a big deal since most competing digital cameras were using internal flash memory and often required serial cables and proprietary software. So these cameras may have had an advantage in terms of reading/write times while taking photos, but retrieving said photos was objectively slower and more cumbersome. And while removable flash media like FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 game download were gaining traction, those were still more expensive than floppy disks and also required adapters to plug them into your computer. Heck, even Sony’s first consumer digital camera, the FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 PC download, stored its images onto non-removable internal memory and cost a lot more as a result at $850. But three and a half-inch floppy disks, mm, they were positively ubiquitous! And combined with the pricing of the cameras that continued to drop as the tech improved, FD Mavicas accounted for up to 40% of the entire digital camera market in the U.S. at their peak.
Though it is worth noting that this was not the first time Sony used disks in their cameras. This wasn’t even the first FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 update download! The earliest prototypes appeared all the way back in 1981 and began hitting the market in 1987, with the name FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 representing these first two letters of the words: Magnetic Video Camera.
This early FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20, but despite that, they were not digital cameras. Rather, these were known as “still video cameras.” This is a topic for another LGR video entirely but the basic idea is that you’ve got an analog video camera that recorded a moment of video and played it back repeatedly so as to provide a still image to a video output device like a TV. But this changed in 1997 with the release of the FD Mavica series, namely the FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 and FD7. Each of these was fully digital still cameras with a quarter-inch 640×480 CCD, the biggest difference between the two introductory models here was that the $599 FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 had a fixed 4.8-millimeter lens and the $799 FD7 had a 4.2 – 42mm lens providing a 10 times optical zoom. Of the original two models, I only have the FD5 here to show in this video, but over the years I’ve stumbled across plenty of these things while thrifting. And two of those that I want to show are the FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 from 2001 and the FD87, also from 2001. I find these models fascinating since, even though they come from the same year, the 75 feels notably older than the 87 in terms of capabilities. So it’s amusing to compare them side-by-side.
While they do differ a bit here and there what’s common across all models of the FD Mavica line are their usage of 3.5-inch high-density floppy discs so no matter which one of the 18 or so models you choose from you can still use the same exact storage media. Although Sony did attempt to bridge the gap between old and new storage tech around the year 2000 with the Memory Stick/Floppy Disk Adapter.
This allowed you to use Sony Memory Sticks with certain later compatible FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 to provide potentially hundreds of megabytes of storage using the same old floppy disk mechanism. And amusingly required to CR-2016 batteries of its own to pull off the job. Man, I love funky media adapters like this. And for the most part, you can also use these same rechargeable lithium-ion batteries across FD FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20, these being the InfoLithium NP-F300 and F500 series. Rather annoyingly though there are certain models like the FD75 that only accept original Sony InfoLithium batteries, so modern third-party ones you can find online today won’t work without some modification. Seeing as most of the original batteries have long since stopped holding a charge and can be rather expensive when they do, this can be super annoying so look out for it! Another commonality between these models is their inclusion of an illuminated 2.5-inch color TFT LCD screen on the back that acts as a viewfinder as well as a way to manage camera settings and saved images.
Several competing cameras were doing this as well, but looking at a screen instead of through an optical viewfinder was still a pretty fresh way of taking photographs in 1997. But as much as these models have in common let’s take a closer look at the FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20, which I really appreciate for how straightforward it is. On the front of the camera past the shutter release button and the flash, you get a 4.8 millimeter fixed focal length lens with an aperture of 2.0, the equivalent of a 47-millimeter lens on a 35 mil camera. And while the focal length was fixed you have this macro mode switch which allowed you to shift the focus much closer to photograph objects three to nine inches away. And all your photos were captured with an ISO of 100 with a shutter speed between 1/60th and 1/4000th of a second. And at a 0.31 megapixel FIVE NIGHT AT FREDDY VR VERSION 1.20 download resolution, compressed in the JPEG file format at one of two levels, which meant that you could store around 40 standard quality images or 20 fine quality images on a single floppy disk. Around the left side here you get the floppy disk mechanism itself which is pretty straightforward.

The Insurance Society of New York

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

The subject of insurance forms is such an exceedingly broad one, that it will be impossible in an address such as this to do more than touch upon it in a general way, and direct attention to some of the more important forms, which, although in general use, may possess features which are not fully understood.
The best form, whether viewed from the standpoint of the insurance company or the insured, is a fair form, one which expresses in clear, unambiguous language the mutual intention of the parties, and affords no cause for surprise on the part of either, after a loss has occurred. But the prepara¬ tion of such a form is not always an easy task, and it is right at this point that the ability of the broker and the underwriter come into play.
A distinguished Englishman declared that the English Constitution was the greatest production that had ever been conceived by the brain of man, but it was subjected to the most scathing criticism and violent assaults by Bentham, the great subversive critic of English law. Twenty-five years ago the New York Standard Policy was prepared by the best legal and lay talent in the insurance, world, and the greatest care was taken to present not only a reasonable and fair form of contract between the insurer and the insured, but one which could be easily read and understood.
While no such extravagant claims have been made for the Standard Policy as were made for the “Matchless Con-maximum of loss collection with a minimum of co-insurance or other resistance than a present day broker, he has not yet been discovered.
The ornate policies in use thirty years ago, with no uniformity in conditions, with their classification of hazards which no one could understand and their fine print which few could read, have given way to plainly printed uniform Standard Policies with materially simplified conditions. But the written portion of the insurance contract owing to our commercial and industrial growth, instead of becoming more simple, has taken exactly the opposite direction, and we now have covering under a single policy or set of policies, the entire property of a coal and mining company, the breweries, public service or traction lines of a whole city and the fixed property, rolling stock and common carrier liability of an entire railroad system involving millions of dollars and con¬ taining items numbering into the thousands. This forcibly illustrates the evolution of the policy form since the issue of the first fire insurance contract by an American company one hundred and sixty years ago, in favor of a gentleman bearing the familiar name of John Smith, covering
“500 £ on his dwelling house on the east side of King Street, between Mulberry and Sassafras, 30 feet front, 40 feet deep, brick, 9-inch party walls, three stories in height, plas¬ tered partitions, open newel bracket stairs, pent houses with board ceilings, garrets finished, three stories, painted brick kitchen, two stories in height, 15 feet 9 inches front, 19 feet 6 inches deep, dresser, shelves, wainscot closet fronts, shingling 1-5 worn.”
It will be observed that in the matter of verbiage this primitive form rivals some of our present day household furniture forms and all will agree that this particular dwelling might have been covered just as effectually and identified quite as easily without such an elaborate description.
Any one who has an insurable interest in property should be permitted to have any form of contract that he is willing to pay for, provided it is not contrary to law or against public policy, and judging from a contract of insurance issued by a certain office not long ago the insuring public apparently has no difficulty in securing any kind of a policy it may desire at any price it may be willing to pay. The contract in ques¬ tion was one for £20,000, covering stock against loss from any cause, except theft on the part of employes, anywhere in the Western Hemisphere, on land or water, without any con¬ ditions, restrictions or limitations whatsoever, written at less than one-half the Exchange rate in the insured’s place of business. An insurance agent upon being asked whether he thought it was good, said that if the company was anywhere near as good as the form, it was all that could be desired, but vouchsafed the opinion that it looked altogether too good to be good.

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

In these days we frequently find concentrated within the walls of a single structure one set of fire insurance policies covering on building, another on leasehold interest, another on rents or rental value—and in addition to this, policies for various tenants covering stock, fixtures, improvements, profits and use and occupancy, subject to the 100% average or co-insurance clause, to say nothing of steam boiler, casualty and liability insurance, thereby entirely eliminating the ele¬ ment of personal risk on the part of the owners, and produc¬ ing a situation which will account in some measure for the 17,000 annual fire alarms and $15,000,000 fire loss in New York City; $230,000,000 annual fire loss in the country at large, and for the constantly increasing percentage of cases where there are two or more fires in the same building and two or more claims from the same claimant.
The most common and perhaps least understood phrase found in policies of fire insurance is what is known as the “Commission Clause,” which reads “his own or held by him in trust or on commission or sold but not delivered” or “re¬ moved.” This clause in one form or another has been in use for many years, and it was originally the impression of un¬ derwriters that owing to the personal nature of the insurance contract a policy thus worded would simply cover the prop¬ erty of the insured and his interest in the property of others, such as advances and storage charges, but the courts have disabused their minds of any such narrow interpretation and have placed such a liberal construction upon the words “held in trust” that they may be justly regarded as among the broadest in the insurance language and scarcely less com¬ prehensive than the familiar term “for account of whom it may concern”; in fact, the principles controlling one phrase are similar to those governing the other.
It has been held that whether a merchant or bailee has assumed responsibility, or agreed to keep the property cov¬ ered or whether he is legally liable or not, if his policies contain the words “held in trust,” the owner may, after a fire, by merely ratifying the insurance of the bailee, appro¬ priate that for which he paid nothing whatever and may file proofs and bring suit in his own name against the bailee’s insurers. Nor is this all, for in some jurisdictions, if the bailee fails to include the loss on property of the bailor in his claim against his insurers, or if he does include it and the amount of insurance collectible is less than the total loss, the bailee may not first reimburse himself for the loss on his own goods and hold the balance in trust for the owners, but must prorate the amount actually collected with those own¬ ers who may have adopted the insurance, although, if he has a lien on any of the goods for charges or advances, this may be deducted from the proportion of insurance money due such owners The phrase “for account of whom it may concern” was formerly confined almost entirely to marine insurance, but in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to intro¬ duce it into policies of fire insurance.
All authorities are agreed that the interests protected by a policy containing these words must have been within the contemplation of him who took out the policy at the time it was issued. It is not necessary that he should have in¬ tended it for the benefit of some then known and particular individuals, but it would include such classes of persons as were intended to be included and who these were may be shown by parol. The owners or others intended to be cov¬ ered may ratify the insurance after a loss and take the bene¬ fit of it, though ignorant of its existence at the time of the issuance of the policy, just the same as under the term “held in trust.”
The words “for account of whom it may concern” are not limited in their protection to those persons who were concerned at the time the insurance was taken out, but will protect those having an insurable interest and who are con¬ cerned at the time when the loss occurs. They will cover the interest of a subsequent purchaser of a part or the whole of the property and supersede the alienation clause of the policy (U. S. S. C.), Hagan and Martin vs. Scottish Union and National Ins. Co., 32 Ins. Law Journal, p. 47; 186 U. S. 423).
A contract of insurance written in the name of “John Doe & Co. for account of whom it may concern” should contain a clause reading “Loss, if any, to be adjusted with and payable to John Doe & Co.,” not “loss, if any, payable to them” or “loss, if any, payable to the assured,” as forms sometimes read.
Policies are frequently written in the name of a bailee covering “On merchandise, his own and on the property of others for which he is responsible,” or “for which he may be liable”—and it has been held that’the effect of these words is to limit the liability of the insurer to the loss on the assured’s own goods and to his legal liability for loss on goods belonging to others, but the words “for which they are or may be liable” have been passed upon by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and they have been given an entirely dif¬ ferent interpretation. That tribunal in the case of The Home Insurance Company vs. Peoria & Pekin Union Railway Co. (28 Insurance Law Journal, p. 289; 178 Ills. 64) decided that the words quoted were merely descriptive of the cars to be insured; that the word “liable” as used in the policy did not signify a perfected or fixed legal liability, but rather a con¬ dition out of which a legal liability might arise.
As illustrative of its position the court said that an assignor of a negotiable note may, with no incorrectness of speech, be said to be liable upon his assignment obligation is not an absolute fixed legal liability but is con¬ tingent upon the financial condition of the maker; and ac¬ cordingly held that the insurance company was liable for loss on all the cars in the possession of the railroad company, notwithstanding the fact that the latter was not legally liable to the owners.
In view of the exceedingly broad construction which the courts have placed upon the time honored and familiar phrases to which reference has been made, it is important for the party insured, whether it be a railroad or other transportation company, a warehouseman, a laundryman, a tailor, a com¬ mission merchant or other bailee, to determine before the fire whether he desires the insurance to be so broad in its cover as to embrace not only his own property and interest, but also the property of everybody else which may happen to be in his custody; if so, he should be careful to insure for a sufficiently large amount to meet all possible co-insurance conditions,, and if he wishes to make sure of being fully reimbursed for his own loss, his only safe course is to insure for the full value of all the property in his possession.
At this point the inquiry which naturally presents itself is, how should a policy be written if a merchant, warehouse¬ man or other bailee desires to protect his own interest but not the interest of any one else? The following form is suggested: “On merchandise his own, and on his interest in and on his legal liability for property held by him in trust or on commission or on joint account with others, or sold but not removed, or on storage or for repairs, while con¬ tained, etc.” This will, it is believed, limit the operation of co-insurance conditions and at the same time prevent the owners from adopting, appropriating or helping themselves to the bailee’s insurance, for which they pay nothing and to which they are not equitably entitled.
Many of the household furniture forms now in use, in addition to embracing almost every conceivable kind of per¬ sonal property except that specifically prohibited by the pol¬ icy conditions, are also made to cover similar property be¬ longing to any member of the family or household, visitors, guests and servants.
This form would seem to indicate considerable ingenu¬ ity on the part of the broker, broad liberality on the part of the insurance company and commendable generosity on the part of the insured, and the latter would probably feel more than compensated by being able to reimburse his guest for any fire damage he might sustain while enjoying his hospi¬ tality, but the amount of insurance carried under such a form should anticipate the possibility of his having a number of guests at one time and a corresponding increase in the value at risk.
It must be borne in mind that in localities where co- insurance conditions prevail the value of property belonging

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The Political Process 0.144 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install The Political Process 0.144 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download The Political Process 0.144 Fit girl repack is free to play a game. Yes, you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download SKATE 3 igg games an ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download this awesome game.

The Political Process 0.144 for Android and iOS?

Yes you can download The Political Process 0.144 on your Android and iOS platform and again they are also free to download.

Also Read:

How To download and Install

Now to download and Install The Political Process 0.144 for free on your PC you have to follow below-given steps. If there is a problem then you can comment down below in the comment section we will love to help you on this.

  1. First, you have to download The Political Process 0.144 on your PC. You can find the download button at the top of the post.
  2. Now the download page will open. There you have to log in.Once you login the download process will start automatically.
  3. If you are unable to The Political Process 0.144 Download game then make sure you have deactivated your Adblocker. Otherwise, you will not be able to download this game on to your PC.
  4. Now if you want to watch the game Installation video and Troubleshooting tutorial then head over to the next section.

TROUBLESHOOTING The Political Process 0.144 Download

Screenshots  (Tap To Enlarge)

 Now if you are interested in the screenshots then tap down on the picture to enlarge them.

The Political Process 0.144 Download

The Political Process 0.144 Gameplay and Reivew

Now it’s time to give you an honest review and gameplay on this awesome game. This is one of the most popular games of 2020.

Yes, this is not The Political Process 0.144 update download, you can’t just touch it lightly, you have to press down a bit and it is ideally used with a stylus. And the calibration is the first thing that you’ll be taking care of as well as some calibration for the analog controller itself. Simple enough stuff, there’s just a few other things to choose like whether you are right or left-handed, the date and the time and your timezone and stuff like that. And then it lets you learn a bit about how The Political Process 0.144 works. And this, The Political Process 0.144, it’s supposed to be one of those systems that make it easier to have your handwriting turned into text, but it’s a little more specific than some others I’ve used.

There are only certain ways that you can write it out to have it converted into text, that is unless you customize it yourself which I definitely would have to do if we are gonna be using this. I would much rather just have a virtual keyboard and type that way, even though that’s not ideal either because the tiny little screen results in tiny little characters to tap on. Either way, you get a bunch of stuff that is pretty common across almost any Palm OS 5 device, you know all that “adult” productivity software that makes this so much more “grown-up” than a Game Boy, uh-huh. You can take memos, you can enter dates into your calendar and make an itinerary, you can read e-books if you were to go to The Political Process 0.144 download and get an e-book, you can calculate calculations using the calculator calculatingly, you can look at photographs which is quite a nice thing to have had back then. Even though of course, they are only at The Political Process 0.144.

And then probably the most fascinating stuff for me was the video and music options. It used The Political Process 0.144 movie player by default, which unless you were downloading stuff specifically for that you’d have to get Kinoma Producer to convert stuff. Naturally, it also has a built-in music application for playing MP3s and such, one of the biggest reasons I wanted a device like this in the mid-2000s. *Andrew The Political Process 0.144 Theme remix plays* And of course, you could play games! And well, it came with just a couple of them, solitaire being one of those. It’s a pretty decent little solitaire program, but this is really not what you got this device for, you could play solitaire on pretty much any The Political Process 0.144 ever made.

With the Zodiac, well, that was about the Zodiac games. And as I mentioned earlier the biggest one that I wanted to get was Duke The Political Process 0.144 Mobile because, at the time, this was the only way that you could play this version of the game. It had its own exclusive levels and features and all that kind of stuff.

I didn’t know anything about it really, I just saw the screenshots and information on The Political Process 0.144 website and thought it looked awesome and I wanted it. But of course, I never got it until adulthood and now I am glad that I didn’t waste my time because honestly, this is not a very good game. It looks pretty good at least, a little bit better than The Political Process 0.144 Advance which was its contemporary.

However the levels are extremely small, you just get a bunch of enemies that are randomly The Political Process 0.144 in all the time, there’s no music, the stuff that each enemy drops is it doesn’t make any sense for what they’re actually shooting. Like it’s just a weird version of the game and it is further let down by the fact that the controls for this thing sucked! Like I mean they’re programmed fine, it works as its intended, it’s just physically the controls of the Zodiac are not suited to my hands.

I feel like you’d have to be like, 12 years old at most for this to make sense. And wasn’t this supposed to be the “adult’s gaming portable?” Talk about a fatal flaw right off the bat! Especially with first-person shooters. I also tried Doom 2 because of course, that is the other game for this that I own physically. And it’s not much better, in fact, it is probably worse because this game is sped up significantly compared to The Political Process 0.144 original.

It’s just way too fast. The music is fast, everything moves faster, the controls are way more responsive than they need to be. It’s just really tricky and as a result much harder to play. Still, portable Doom 2 would have been pretty The Political Process 0.144 awesome at the time. But then again if I really wanted that I would have gotten a Game Boy Advance. But there is one kind of saving grace for the Zodiac and that is the fact that it is incredibly easy to install your own The Political Process 0.144 and independent software that you downloaded. And the HotSync capability is dead simple as you would expect for a Palm OS 5 device. All you gotta do is install the Palm Desktop software The Political Process 0.144 thingy from Tapwave and then press down the HotSync button on the cable or cradle, which is the cable in this case, and there you go! It syncs everything that’s on the Zodiac itself to your PC and whatever you’ve told the PC to send them to the Zodiac it’ll do that too.

And yeah the Palm Desktop The Political Process 0.144 software makes it super easy: you just plop a file in there, hit sync, and there you go. Or you can just copy things over directly to an SD card through an SD card reader on any random PC and then insert it, and chances are if you’ve done it correctly it’ll work just fine. And yeah, there was a relatively significant scene of people making their own games and porting source code for other games and just making all sorts of cool stuff for the Zodiac. And of course, it can run a crapload of Palm software as well.

I am mostly interested in the Zodiac specific stuff though since it takes advantage of its hardware in particular. For example, one program that was kind of a killer app for the Zodiac, if you can say that it had one, and that was TCPMP or The Core Pocket Media Player. This is available for all sorts of PDA kind of portable devices, but the version for The Political Process 0.144 was pretty awesome since it provided hardware scaling for all kinds of videos. Namely, DivX which was very popular at the time, so if you were to encode pretty much anything into DivX and put it on an SD card and play it back through this you’ve got a neat little portable media player for watching your favorite YouTube videos offline. The Political Process 0.144 download PC Game Thrifts theme plays* And another option for moving around files that just highly amuses me is the Bluetooth functionality. And yes due to the magic of legacy backward-compatibility goodness you can make The Political Process 0.144 Zodiac communicate with a modern smart device.

So I’ve got a 12-megapixel photograph taken on my Galaxy Note 8 sending over Bluetooth to the Zodiac right here and there you go! You can admire and edit your photographs right from the built-in software of the Zodiac, even though it is pretty The Political Process 0.144 slow because it’s a giant picture. But hey, it works! another realm that’s fascinating to explore with the Zodiac is the area of unreleased games that ended up getting leaked in the years following the device’s untimely demise. Like this version of Tomb Raider 1 and 2 that never got completed. And it makes sense that there are a good number of unfinished games like this for the system since so many developers signed on with high expectations, only to see the system fail spectacularly with the gaming public. Kind of a shame too since the hardware itself really is quite impressive for the blip in time that it existed.

And this in-development Tomb Raider build is a good example of that. Same with The Political Process 0.144 scene which puts that 200 megahertz ARM processor to the test by emulating classic computers arcade games and consoles. *Sonic the Hedgehog 3 for the Sega Genesis attempts to play* Sometimes poorly, but well it tries its best.

A soft-modded The Political Process 0.144 is still way better in this respect if you’re looking for mid-2000s portables with great emulators, but I still find these programs fun to fiddle around with regardless. And that’s about it for this video on The Political Process 0.144 It’s one of the most fascinating tech failures that I remember watching.

That was all on The Political Process 0.144 free download latest update. If you have any questions then comment down below in the comment section. The Political Process 0.144 Download Free.

The Insurance Society of New York

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

The subject of insurance forms is such an exceedingly broad one, that it will be impossible in an address such as this to do more than touch upon it in a general way, and direct attention to some of the more important forms, which, although in general use, may possess features which are not fully understood.
The best form, whether viewed from the standpoint of the insurance company or the insured, is a fair form, one which expresses in clear, unambiguous language the mutual intention of the parties, and affords no cause for surprise on the part of either, after a loss has occurred. But the prepara¬ tion of such a form is not always an easy task, and it is right at this point that the ability of the broker and the underwriter come into play.
A distinguished Englishman declared that the English Constitution was the greatest production that had ever been conceived by the brain of man, but it was subjected to the most scathing criticism and violent assaults by Bentham, the great subversive critic of English law. Twenty-five years ago the New York Standard Policy was prepared by the best legal and lay talent in the insurance, world, and the greatest care was taken to present not only a reasonable and fair form of contract between the insurer and the insured, but one which could be easily read and understood.
While no such extravagant claims have been made for the Standard Policy as were made for the “Matchless Con-maximum of loss collection with a minimum of co-insurance or other resistance than a present day broker, he has not yet been discovered.
The ornate policies in use thirty years ago, with no uniformity in conditions, with their classification of hazards which no one could understand and their fine print which few could read, have given way to plainly printed uniform Standard Policies with materially simplified conditions. But the written portion of the insurance contract owing to our commercial and industrial growth, instead of becoming more simple, has taken exactly the opposite direction, and we now have covering under a single policy or set of policies, the entire property of a coal and mining company, the breweries, public service or traction lines of a whole city and the fixed property, rolling stock and common carrier liability of an entire railroad system involving millions of dollars and con¬ taining items numbering into the thousands. This forcibly illustrates the evolution of the policy form since the issue of the first fire insurance contract by an American company one hundred and sixty years ago, in favor of a gentleman bearing the familiar name of John Smith, covering
“500 £ on his dwelling house on the east side of King Street, between Mulberry and Sassafras, 30 feet front, 40 feet deep, brick, 9-inch party walls, three stories in height, plas¬ tered partitions, open newel bracket stairs, pent houses with board ceilings, garrets finished, three stories, painted brick kitchen, two stories in height, 15 feet 9 inches front, 19 feet 6 inches deep, dresser, shelves, wainscot closet fronts, shingling 1-5 worn.”
It will be observed that in the matter of verbiage this primitive form rivals some of our present day household furniture forms and all will agree that this particular dwelling might have been covered just as effectually and identified quite as easily without such an elaborate description.
Any one who has an insurable interest in property should be permitted to have any form of contract that he is willing to pay for, provided it is not contrary to law or against public policy, and judging from a contract of insurance issued by a certain office not long ago the insuring public apparently has no difficulty in securing any kind of a policy it may desire at any price it may be willing to pay. The contract in ques¬ tion was one for £20,000, covering stock against loss from any cause, except theft on the part of employes, anywhere in the Western Hemisphere, on land or water, without any con¬ ditions, restrictions or limitations whatsoever, written at less than one-half the Exchange rate in the insured’s place of business. An insurance agent upon being asked whether he thought it was good, said that if the company was anywhere near as good as the form, it was all that could be desired, but vouchsafed the opinion that it looked altogether too good to be good.

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

In these days we frequently find concentrated within the walls of a single structure one set of fire insurance policies covering on building, another on leasehold interest, another on rents or rental value—and in addition to this, policies for various tenants covering stock, fixtures, improvements, profits and use and occupancy, subject to the 100% average or co-insurance clause, to say nothing of steam boiler, casualty and liability insurance, thereby entirely eliminating the ele¬ ment of personal risk on the part of the owners, and produc¬ ing a situation which will account in some measure for the 17,000 annual fire alarms and $15,000,000 fire loss in New York City; $230,000,000 annual fire loss in the country at large, and for the constantly increasing percentage of cases where there are two or more fires in the same building and two or more claims from the same claimant.
The most common and perhaps least understood phrase found in policies of fire insurance is what is known as the “Commission Clause,” which reads “his own or held by him in trust or on commission or sold but not delivered” or “re¬ moved.” This clause in one form or another has been in use for many years, and it was originally the impression of un¬ derwriters that owing to the personal nature of the insurance contract a policy thus worded would simply cover the prop¬ erty of the insured and his interest in the property of others, such as advances and storage charges, but the courts have disabused their minds of any such narrow interpretation and have placed such a liberal construction upon the words “held in trust” that they may be justly regarded as among the broadest in the insurance language and scarcely less com¬ prehensive than the familiar term “for account of whom it may concern”; in fact, the principles controlling one phrase are similar to those governing the other.
It has been held that whether a merchant or bailee has assumed responsibility, or agreed to keep the property cov¬ ered or whether he is legally liable or not, if his policies contain the words “held in trust,” the owner may, after a fire, by merely ratifying the insurance of the bailee, appro¬ priate that for which he paid nothing whatever and may file proofs and bring suit in his own name against the bailee’s insurers. Nor is this all, for in some jurisdictions, if the bailee fails to include the loss on property of the bailor in his claim against his insurers, or if he does include it and the amount of insurance collectible is less than the total loss, the bailee may not first reimburse himself for the loss on his own goods and hold the balance in trust for the owners, but must prorate the amount actually collected with those own¬ ers who may have adopted the insurance, although, if he has a lien on any of the goods for charges or advances, this may be deducted from the proportion of insurance money due such owners The phrase “for account of whom it may concern” was formerly confined almost entirely to marine insurance, but in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to intro¬ duce it into policies of fire insurance.
All authorities are agreed that the interests protected by a policy containing these words must have been within the contemplation of him who took out the policy at the time it was issued. It is not necessary that he should have in¬ tended it for the benefit of some then known and particular individuals, but it would include such classes of persons as were intended to be included and who these were may be shown by parol. The owners or others intended to be cov¬ ered may ratify the insurance after a loss and take the bene¬ fit of it, though ignorant of its existence at the time of the issuance of the policy, just the same as under the term “held in trust.”
The words “for account of whom it may concern” are not limited in their protection to those persons who were concerned at the time the insurance was taken out, but will protect those having an insurable interest and who are con¬ cerned at the time when the loss occurs. They will cover the interest of a subsequent purchaser of a part or the whole of the property and supersede the alienation clause of the policy (U. S. S. C.), Hagan and Martin vs. Scottish Union and National Ins. Co., 32 Ins. Law Journal, p. 47; 186 U. S. 423).
A contract of insurance written in the name of “John Doe & Co. for account of whom it may concern” should contain a clause reading “Loss, if any, to be adjusted with and payable to John Doe & Co.,” not “loss, if any, payable to them” or “loss, if any, payable to the assured,” as forms sometimes read.
Policies are frequently written in the name of a bailee covering “On merchandise, his own and on the property of others for which he is responsible,” or “for which he may be liable”—and it has been held that’the effect of these words is to limit the liability of the insurer to the loss on the assured’s own goods and to his legal liability for loss on goods belonging to others, but the words “for which they are or may be liable” have been passed upon by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and they have been given an entirely dif¬ ferent interpretation. That tribunal in the case of The Home Insurance Company vs. Peoria & Pekin Union Railway Co. (28 Insurance Law Journal, p. 289; 178 Ills. 64) decided that the words quoted were merely descriptive of the cars to be insured; that the word “liable” as used in the policy did not signify a perfected or fixed legal liability, but rather a con¬ dition out of which a legal liability might arise.
As illustrative of its position the court said that an assignor of a negotiable note may, with no incorrectness of speech, be said to be liable upon his assignment obligation is not an absolute fixed legal liability but is con¬ tingent upon the financial condition of the maker; and ac¬ cordingly held that the insurance company was liable for loss on all the cars in the possession of the railroad company, notwithstanding the fact that the latter was not legally liable to the owners.
In view of the exceedingly broad construction which the courts have placed upon the time honored and familiar phrases to which reference has been made, it is important for the party insured, whether it be a railroad or other transportation company, a warehouseman, a laundryman, a tailor, a com¬ mission merchant or other bailee, to determine before the fire whether he desires the insurance to be so broad in its cover as to embrace not only his own property and interest, but also the property of everybody else which may happen to be in his custody; if so, he should be careful to insure for a sufficiently large amount to meet all possible co-insurance conditions,, and if he wishes to make sure of being fully reimbursed for his own loss, his only safe course is to insure for the full value of all the property in his possession.
At this point the inquiry which naturally presents itself is, how should a policy be written if a merchant, warehouse¬ man or other bailee desires to protect his own interest but not the interest of any one else? The following form is suggested: “On merchandise his own, and on his interest in and on his legal liability for property held by him in trust or on commission or on joint account with others, or sold but not removed, or on storage or for repairs, while con¬ tained, etc.” This will, it is believed, limit the operation of co-insurance conditions and at the same time prevent the owners from adopting, appropriating or helping themselves to the bailee’s insurance, for which they pay nothing and to which they are not equitably entitled.
Many of the household furniture forms now in use, in addition to embracing almost every conceivable kind of per¬ sonal property except that specifically prohibited by the pol¬ icy conditions, are also made to cover similar property be¬ longing to any member of the family or household, visitors, guests and servants.
This form would seem to indicate considerable ingenu¬ ity on the part of the broker, broad liberality on the part of the insurance company and commendable generosity on the part of the insured, and the latter would probably feel more than compensated by being able to reimburse his guest for any fire damage he might sustain while enjoying his hospi¬ tality, but the amount of insurance carried under such a form should anticipate the possibility of his having a number of guests at one time and a corresponding increase in the value at risk.
It must be borne in mind that in localities where co- insurance conditions prevail the value of property belonging

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The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 Fit girl repack is free to play a game.Yes, you can get this game for free. Now there are different website from which you can download The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 igg games an ocean of games are the two most popular websites.Also ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download this awesome game.

The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 for Android and iOS?

Yes, you can download The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 on your Android and iOS platform and again they are also free to download.

Also Read:

How To download and Install The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2

Now to download and Install The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 for free on your PC you have to follow below-given steps. If there is a problem then you can comment down below in the comment section we will love to help you on this.

  1. First you have to download The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 on your PC. You can find the download button at the top of the post.
  2. Now the download page will open. There you have to log in. Once you login the download process will start automatically.
  3. If you are unable to download this game then make sure you have deactivated your Adblocker. Otherwise, you will not be able to download this game on to your PC.
  4. Now if you want to watch the game Installation video and Troubleshooting tutorial then head over to the next section.

TROUBLESHOOTING The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 Download

Screenshots  (Tap To Enlarge)

 Now if you are interested in the screenshots then tap down on the picture to enlarge them.

People Playground 1.3 BETA Gameplay and Reivew

Now it’s time give you an honest review and gameplay on this awesome game.This is one of the most popular game of 2020.

Three chesty wardrobe shelving type things for holding various objects and clothing. A patterned rug for plopping down in the middle of the backyard or wherever. A pretty standard toilet and a sink that handily works off-the-grid. Two TVs, one standing and one that attaches to a wall, each pulling quadruple duty by also acting as a display shelf, a bookcase, and a stereo. Various other wall-mountable items are here too, including a mirror, a door, two shelves of random thingies, four potted plants strung together, and a plant-inspired piece of artwork.

Three sets of hanging light bulbs, each with their own varying degrees of droopiness. An ottoman, that isn’t an ottoman I guess, since it’s a pouf? Whatever it is cats love it. There’s also a standard bed and a standard The Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 update download. As well as this lamp that should provide storage space according to its description, yet it’s totally unusable as such. It’s just a lamp. Seriously, why tout its supposed dual purpose as a shelf and then make it so you can’t set anything on it? At least it makes for decent kindling, so I guess it does serve a second purpose after all.

And finally, you also get three new chairs, although two of them are slightly confusing at first. This dining chair doesn’t actually function with the new dining table. For that you have to use these high chairs, and once I realized that it was pretty awesome, letting me really cram in a he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 torrent seating in a super small space. Finally, the headlining new items of the Tiny Living pack are Murphy Beds, with and without a built-in loveseat. And at first, this seems pretty useful since you can fold them away when not in use and those wardrobe shelving units attach to the sides for a clean-looking modular design. But really, Murphy Beds are… confusing. While I applaud the addition of new he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 download snuggle zones, the usage of them in this pack doesn’t make much practical sense. For one, they require the exact same 3×2 tile floor space as a normal bed.

You get a he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 on one of them, sure, but it still leaves tiles of unusable space underneath. And since sims can’t get into bed from the front, only the sides, you need another set of tiles off to the left and right at least half a tile wide. The worst part though is this stupid animation that plays out far too often, where sims try to pull down the bed then fail in spectacular fashion. It’d be fine if it happened one out of every 20 times or something, but nope, sims fail like every 3 or 4 times you open the dumb thing. [bed fails, sim gets owned] Making this worse is the fact that this far-too-frequent animation comes with an unusually high risk of killing your sims! bed fails, sim dies] Now, okay, I’m all for new ways to take out bothersome sims, that’s just good times. But “Death by Murphy Bed” seems a bit silly, and again, it’s tied to an he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 animation that happens rather often. Yes, there are now bed upgrade options in the game, accomplishing things like increasing comfort and preventing it from getting stuck.

So you can alleviate the issue but still, I’d rather it wasn’t so prevalent to begin with. And in my opinion, these repetitive slapstick failure animations stopped being cute like fifteen packs ago. So yeah, can’t say I’ll be using Murphy Beds in my tiny builds going forward, since the way they work is annoying and their inclusion in this particular pack is questionable in the first place. Why not add them in the Discover University pack, that would’ve made a ton more sense in my book, more so than a pack about he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2-tile houses.

I really think bunk beds would’ve been an ideal addition to the Tiny Living pack instead, seeing as bunk beds actually do free up room, providing two beds in a single he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2. For that matter though, why not add better loft options? Lofts are a staple of tiny home designs, and making them in The Sims 4 means adding a second story with a cumbersome full-sized staircase. Ladders are used all the time in real life tiny homes, but nope, nowhere to be found in Tiny Living. Even spiral staircases would be more space-efficient but those still aren’t a thing either. For that matter, why not add steeper, narrower normal stairs? Or at least provide some storage options underneath them, which again, is something that you see all the time in actual tiny houses. Not that it matters too much I suppose, since sims all have an infinite household inventory that hides as many items as you like within a magic unseen void, hrm. Still, while I’m on the topic of things I wish were included instead of he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2 update download beds, why not convertible futons or pull out sofa beds? Under-the-counter mini-fridges or in-wall ovens and microwaves? How about portable induction cooktops? Or over-the-sink shelf units and other kinds of stackable knickknack storage things?

Heck, composting toilets, solar power, and rain catchers would’ve been nice, seeing as we’ve already got off-the-grid lots. Instead, we get cumbersomely large homicidal beds and storage lamps that don’t store anything. At least they took the time to add Baby Yoda to the game, so I guess that means it all evens out in the end, right? Heh, ahh now I’m just being grumpy when in reality Tiny Living is not the worst stuff pack by any means. In fact, I think it’s one of the better ones for my he Walking Dead Saints & Sinners Hotfix #2. It’s just that this doggone game’s been around for almost six years now, and after sixteen stuff packs, I’m more than a bit fatigued.

There are a number of disappointing aspects to Tiny Living Stuff, no bones about it, and I know they’ve could’ve added just a bit more in terms of useful objects and quality of life improvements. But they didn’t, and that’s just kinda how it goes, we all know that. Still, I’ll personally be using a number of the items added here going forward, along with building more tiny houses for the challenge it provides and the rewards it unlocks.

The Insurance Society of New York

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

The subject of insurance forms is such an exceedingly broad one, that it will be impossible in an address such as this to do more than touch upon it in a general way, and direct attention to some of the more important forms, which, although in general use, may possess features which are not fully understood.
The best form, whether viewed from the standpoint of the insurance company or the insured, is a fair form, one which expresses in clear, unambiguous language the mutual intention of the parties, and affords no cause for surprise on the part of either, after a loss has occurred. But the prepara¬ tion of such a form is not always an easy task, and it is right at this point that the ability of the broker and the underwriter come into play.
A distinguished Englishman declared that the English Constitution was the greatest production that had ever been conceived by the brain of man, but it was subjected to the most scathing criticism and violent assaults by Bentham, the great subversive critic of English law. Twenty-five years ago the New York Standard Policy was prepared by the best legal and lay talent in the insurance, world, and the greatest care was taken to present not only a reasonable and fair form of contract between the insurer and the insured, but one which could be easily read and understood.
While no such extravagant claims have been made for the Standard Policy as were made for the “Matchless Con-maximum of loss collection with a minimum of co-insurance or other resistance than a present day broker, he has not yet been discovered.
The ornate policies in use thirty years ago, with no uniformity in conditions, with their classification of hazards which no one could understand and their fine print which few could read, have given way to plainly printed uniform Standard Policies with materially simplified conditions. But the written portion of the insurance contract owing to our commercial and industrial growth, instead of becoming more simple, has taken exactly the opposite direction, and we now have covering under a single policy or set of policies, the entire property of a coal and mining company, the breweries, public service or traction lines of a whole city and the fixed property, rolling stock and common carrier liability of an entire railroad system involving millions of dollars and con¬ taining items numbering into the thousands. This forcibly illustrates the evolution of the policy form since the issue of the first fire insurance contract by an American company one hundred and sixty years ago, in favor of a gentleman bearing the familiar name of John Smith, covering
“500 £ on his dwelling house on the east side of King Street, between Mulberry and Sassafras, 30 feet front, 40 feet deep, brick, 9-inch party walls, three stories in height, plas¬ tered partitions, open newel bracket stairs, pent houses with board ceilings, garrets finished, three stories, painted brick kitchen, two stories in height, 15 feet 9 inches front, 19 feet 6 inches deep, dresser, shelves, wainscot closet fronts, shingling 1-5 worn.”
It will be observed that in the matter of verbiage this primitive form rivals some of our present day household furniture forms and all will agree that this particular dwelling might have been covered just as effectually and identified quite as easily without such an elaborate description.
Any one who has an insurable interest in property should be permitted to have any form of contract that he is willing to pay for, provided it is not contrary to law or against public policy, and judging from a contract of insurance issued by a certain office not long ago the insuring public apparently has no difficulty in securing any kind of a policy it may desire at any price it may be willing to pay. The contract in ques¬ tion was one for £20,000, covering stock against loss from any cause, except theft on the part of employes, anywhere in the Western Hemisphere, on land or water, without any con¬ ditions, restrictions or limitations whatsoever, written at less than one-half the Exchange rate in the insured’s place of business. An insurance agent upon being asked whether he thought it was good, said that if the company was anywhere near as good as the form, it was all that could be desired, but vouchsafed the opinion that it looked altogether too good to be good.

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

In these days we frequently find concentrated within the walls of a single structure one set of fire insurance policies covering on building, another on leasehold interest, another on rents or rental value—and in addition to this, policies for various tenants covering stock, fixtures, improvements, profits and use and occupancy, subject to the 100% average or co-insurance clause, to say nothing of steam boiler, casualty and liability insurance, thereby entirely eliminating the ele¬ ment of personal risk on the part of the owners, and produc¬ ing a situation which will account in some measure for the 17,000 annual fire alarms and $15,000,000 fire loss in New York City; $230,000,000 annual fire loss in the country at large, and for the constantly increasing percentage of cases where there are two or more fires in the same building and two or more claims from the same claimant.
The most common and perhaps least understood phrase found in policies of fire insurance is what is known as the “Commission Clause,” which reads “his own or held by him in trust or on commission or sold but not delivered” or “re¬ moved.” This clause in one form or another has been in use for many years, and it was originally the impression of un¬ derwriters that owing to the personal nature of the insurance contract a policy thus worded would simply cover the prop¬ erty of the insured and his interest in the property of others, such as advances and storage charges, but the courts have disabused their minds of any such narrow interpretation and have placed such a liberal construction upon the words “held in trust” that they may be justly regarded as among the broadest in the insurance language and scarcely less com¬ prehensive than the familiar term “for account of whom it may concern”; in fact, the principles controlling one phrase are similar to those governing the other.
It has been held that whether a merchant or bailee has assumed responsibility, or agreed to keep the property cov¬ ered or whether he is legally liable or not, if his policies contain the words “held in trust,” the owner may, after a fire, by merely ratifying the insurance of the bailee, appro¬ priate that for which he paid nothing whatever and may file proofs and bring suit in his own name against the bailee’s insurers. Nor is this all, for in some jurisdictions, if the bailee fails to include the loss on property of the bailor in his claim against his insurers, or if he does include it and the amount of insurance collectible is less than the total loss, the bailee may not first reimburse himself for the loss on his own goods and hold the balance in trust for the owners, but must prorate the amount actually collected with those own¬ ers who may have adopted the insurance, although, if he has a lien on any of the goods for charges or advances, this may be deducted from the proportion of insurance money due such owners The phrase “for account of whom it may concern” was formerly confined almost entirely to marine insurance, but in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to intro¬ duce it into policies of fire insurance.
All authorities are agreed that the interests protected by a policy containing these words must have been within the contemplation of him who took out the policy at the time it was issued. It is not necessary that he should have in¬ tended it for the benefit of some then known and particular individuals, but it would include such classes of persons as were intended to be included and who these were may be shown by parol. The owners or others intended to be cov¬ ered may ratify the insurance after a loss and take the bene¬ fit of it, though ignorant of its existence at the time of the issuance of the policy, just the same as under the term “held in trust.”
The words “for account of whom it may concern” are not limited in their protection to those persons who were concerned at the time the insurance was taken out, but will protect those having an insurable interest and who are con¬ cerned at the time when the loss occurs. They will cover the interest of a subsequent purchaser of a part or the whole of the property and supersede the alienation clause of the policy (U. S. S. C.), Hagan and Martin vs. Scottish Union and National Ins. Co., 32 Ins. Law Journal, p. 47; 186 U. S. 423).
A contract of insurance written in the name of “John Doe & Co. for account of whom it may concern” should contain a clause reading “Loss, if any, to be adjusted with and payable to John Doe & Co.,” not “loss, if any, payable to them” or “loss, if any, payable to the assured,” as forms sometimes read.
Policies are frequently written in the name of a bailee covering “On merchandise, his own and on the property of others for which he is responsible,” or “for which he may be liable”—and it has been held that’the effect of these words is to limit the liability of the insurer to the loss on the assured’s own goods and to his legal liability for loss on goods belonging to others, but the words “for which they are or may be liable” have been passed upon by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and they have been given an entirely dif¬ ferent interpretation. That tribunal in the case of The Home Insurance Company vs. Peoria & Pekin Union Railway Co. (28 Insurance Law Journal, p. 289; 178 Ills. 64) decided that the words quoted were merely descriptive of the cars to be insured; that the word “liable” as used in the policy did not signify a perfected or fixed legal liability, but rather a con¬ dition out of which a legal liability might arise.
As illustrative of its position the court said that an assignor of a negotiable note may, with no incorrectness of speech, be said to be liable upon his assignment obligation is not an absolute fixed legal liability but is con¬ tingent upon the financial condition of the maker; and ac¬ cordingly held that the insurance company was liable for loss on all the cars in the possession of the railroad company, notwithstanding the fact that the latter was not legally liable to the owners.
In view of the exceedingly broad construction which the courts have placed upon the time honored and familiar phrases to which reference has been made, it is important for the party insured, whether it be a railroad or other transportation company, a warehouseman, a laundryman, a tailor, a com¬ mission merchant or other bailee, to determine before the fire whether he desires the insurance to be so broad in its cover as to embrace not only his own property and interest, but also the property of everybody else which may happen to be in his custody; if so, he should be careful to insure for a sufficiently large amount to meet all possible co-insurance conditions,, and if he wishes to make sure of being fully reimbursed for his own loss, his only safe course is to insure for the full value of all the property in his possession.
At this point the inquiry which naturally presents itself is, how should a policy be written if a merchant, warehouse¬ man or other bailee desires to protect his own interest but not the interest of any one else? The following form is suggested: “On merchandise his own, and on his interest in and on his legal liability for property held by him in trust or on commission or on joint account with others, or sold but not removed, or on storage or for repairs, while con¬ tained, etc.” This will, it is believed, limit the operation of co-insurance conditions and at the same time prevent the owners from adopting, appropriating or helping themselves to the bailee’s insurance, for which they pay nothing and to which they are not equitably entitled.
Many of the household furniture forms now in use, in addition to embracing almost every conceivable kind of per¬ sonal property except that specifically prohibited by the pol¬ icy conditions, are also made to cover similar property be¬ longing to any member of the family or household, visitors, guests and servants.
This form would seem to indicate considerable ingenu¬ ity on the part of the broker, broad liberality on the part of the insurance company and commendable generosity on the part of the insured, and the latter would probably feel more than compensated by being able to reimburse his guest for any fire damage he might sustain while enjoying his hospi¬ tality, but the amount of insurance carried under such a form should anticipate the possibility of his having a number of guests at one time and a corresponding increase in the value at risk.
It must be borne in mind that in localities where co- insurance conditions prevail the value of property belonging

Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download

Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download PC Game

Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Fitgirl Repack Free Download PC Game final version or you can say the latest update is released for PC. And the best this about this DLC is that it’s free to download. In this tutorial, we will show you how to download and Install Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Torrent for free. Before you download and install this awesome game on your computer note that this game is highly compressed and is the repack version of this game.

Download Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Fit girl repack is a free to play a game. Yes, you can get this game for free. Now there are different websites from which you can download Stardew Valley 1.4.4 igg games and the ocean of games are the two most popular websites. Also, ova games and the skidrow reloaded also provide you to download this awesome game.

Stardew Valley 1.4.4 for Android and iOS?

Yes, you can download Stardew Valley 1.4.4 on your Android and iOS platform and again they are also free to download.

Also Read:

How To download and Install Stardew Valley 1.4.4

Now to download and Install Stardew Valley 1.4.4 for free on your PC you have to follow below-given steps. If there is a problem then you can comment down below in the comment section we will love to help you on this.

  1. First, you have to download Stardew Valley 1.4.4 on your PC. You can find the download button at the top of the post.
  2. Now the download page will open. There you have to log in. Once you login the download process will start automatically.
  3. If you are unable to Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Downloads game then make sure you have deactivated your Adblocker. Otherwise, you will not be able to download this game on to your PC.
  4. Now if you want to watch Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download game Installation video and Troubleshooting tutorial then head over to the next section.

TROUBLESHOOTING Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download

Screenshots  (Tap To Enlarge)

 Now if you are interested in the screenshots then tap down on the picture to enlarge them.
Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download
Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Download

Gameplay and Review

Now it’s time to give you an honest review and gameplay on this awesome game. This is one of the most popular games of 2020.

 

Finally, a stuff pack that’s precisely what I always wanted! Stardew Valley 1.4.4 Stuff, where your sims are shrunk down to a fraction of the size due to a mishap involving a baseball and a broken window, and then — what? -It’s about tiny homes. -Aw man really? I guess that makes more sense, sigh. All right so yeah, the pack’s called Tiny Living Stuff, but instead of awesome shrunken adventures, it’s all about living in a relatively undersized home. It costs $10 and is the sixteenth Stardew Valley 1.4.4 update download pack to date good grief what the balls. And I gotta say, even though I’d be way more into a pack about miniaturized sims, I was still intrigued by Tiny Living here.

Because yeah man, I’ve been rather tiny-curious for years now, immediately sucked into all the Stardew Valley 1.4.4 update download and reality shows focusing on the Tiny House Movement. And the whole idea is to make the most out of a small space, rejecting the concept of buying a multi-thousand square foot home. I myself live in a house that’s about 800 square feet or 74 square meters, and while objectively not “tiny,” it’s certainly a lot smaller than I could’ve chosen and that was very much on purpose. I’ve enjoyed the challenge of trying to make the most of the space I have without piling a million things on top of each other, so the chance to do so virtually in the Stardew Valley 1.4.4 is absolutely my cup of nitro cold-brewed coffee.

The first thing you’re greeted with on installing Tiny Living Stuff is a message about living in a tiny house and stuff. A pre-made tiny home has been provided to plop down anywhere you like, acting as an example of what exactly constitutes a tiny home in The Sims 4 universe. In case you’re unaware, a real-life tiny house is generally considered to be one under 37 square meters or 400 square feet. This example home in Stardew Valley 1.4.4 is composed of 32 tiles, and if we assume each tile is a square meter, then we’ve got 32 square meters or 350 square feet, a bit below that of a tiny house IRL.

However, Tiny Living Stuff lays out three different tiers of tiny houses, each with its own perks and requirements. The smallest being the Tier 1 “Stardew Valley 1.4.4 update, Tier 2 is a “Tiny Home” at up to 64 tiles, and Tier 3 is a “Small Home” at up to 100 tiles. The most fascinating aspect of these tiered home sizes is that when you meet the requirements on a lot designed as a Residential Tiny Home, you’re provided a number of generous rewards for living there. Things separate from lot traits, like faster learning, greater comfort, happier sims, healthier plants, and better relationships. So the less you do with doing more, the more you’re rewarded for doing more with less! Er, by that I mean that, as of now, there are incentives to go small and a kind of odd punishment for having a huge house. It makes me wonder if they’ll balance it out with a mansion-focused pack in the future.

Heck, they could even call it Stardew Valley 1.4.4, I’d be down with that. Anyway yeah, this is a stuff pack packed with stuff so let’s unpack it and stuff! First is an allotment of hair, accessories, and clothing for pretty much everyone this time around, including the youngins.

Fitting right in with the overall “hygge” theme of living in a warm little cozy home, there’s a bunch of warm, cozy attire. Regardless of how much I want some of those sweaters for real though, that’s just the garb and garment goods. Let’s get onto the main event, kicking off with an assortment of single-tile desks and tables, suitable for all manner of decking and tabling. Followed by a few decorative yet functional items, including a lamp, readable books, and light table candles in a cluttered tray.

 

The Insurance Society of New York

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

The subject of insurance forms is such an exceedingly broad one, that it will be impossible in an address such as this to do more than touch upon it in a general way, and direct attention to some of the more important forms, which, although in general use, may possess features which are not fully understood.
The best form, whether viewed from the standpoint of the insurance company or the insured, is a fair form, one which expresses in clear, unambiguous language the mutual intention of the parties, and affords no cause for surprise on the part of either, after a loss has occurred. But the prepara¬ tion of such a form is not always an easy task, and it is right at this point that the ability of the broker and the underwriter come into play.
A distinguished Englishman declared that the English Constitution was the greatest production that had ever been conceived by the brain of man, but it was subjected to the most scathing criticism and violent assaults by Bentham, the great subversive critic of English law. Twenty-five years ago the New York Standard Policy was prepared by the best legal and lay talent in the insurance, world, and the greatest care was taken to present not only a reasonable and fair form of contract between the insurer and the insured, but one which could be easily read and understood.
While no such extravagant claims have been made for the Standard Policy as were made for the “Matchless Con-maximum of loss collection with a minimum of co-insurance or other resistance than a present day broker, he has not yet been discovered.
The ornate policies in use thirty years ago, with no uniformity in conditions, with their classification of hazards which no one could understand and their fine print which few could read, have given way to plainly printed uniform Standard Policies with materially simplified conditions. But the written portion of the insurance contract owing to our commercial and industrial growth, instead of becoming more simple, has taken exactly the opposite direction, and we now have covering under a single policy or set of policies, the entire property of a coal and mining company, the breweries, public service or traction lines of a whole city and the fixed property, rolling stock and common carrier liability of an entire railroad system involving millions of dollars and con¬ taining items numbering into the thousands. This forcibly illustrates the evolution of the policy form since the issue of the first fire insurance contract by an American company one hundred and sixty years ago, in favor of a gentleman bearing the familiar name of John Smith, covering
“500 £ on his dwelling house on the east side of King Street, between Mulberry and Sassafras, 30 feet front, 40 feet deep, brick, 9-inch party walls, three stories in height, plas¬ tered partitions, open newel bracket stairs, pent houses with board ceilings, garrets finished, three stories, painted brick kitchen, two stories in height, 15 feet 9 inches front, 19 feet 6 inches deep, dresser, shelves, wainscot closet fronts, shingling 1-5 worn.”
It will be observed that in the matter of verbiage this primitive form rivals some of our present day household furniture forms and all will agree that this particular dwelling might have been covered just as effectually and identified quite as easily without such an elaborate description.
Any one who has an insurable interest in property should be permitted to have any form of contract that he is willing to pay for, provided it is not contrary to law or against public policy, and judging from a contract of insurance issued by a certain office not long ago the insuring public apparently has no difficulty in securing any kind of a policy it may desire at any price it may be willing to pay. The contract in ques¬ tion was one for £20,000, covering stock against loss from any cause, except theft on the part of employes, anywhere in the Western Hemisphere, on land or water, without any con¬ ditions, restrictions or limitations whatsoever, written at less than one-half the Exchange rate in the insured’s place of business. An insurance agent upon being asked whether he thought it was good, said that if the company was anywhere near as good as the form, it was all that could be desired, but vouchsafed the opinion that it looked altogether too good to be good.

The Insurance Society of New York
The Insurance Society of New York

In these days we frequently find concentrated within the walls of a single structure one set of fire insurance policies covering on building, another on leasehold interest, another on rents or rental value—and in addition to this, policies for various tenants covering stock, fixtures, improvements, profits and use and occupancy, subject to the 100% average or co-insurance clause, to say nothing of steam boiler, casualty and liability insurance, thereby entirely eliminating the ele¬ ment of personal risk on the part of the owners, and produc¬ ing a situation which will account in some measure for the 17,000 annual fire alarms and $15,000,000 fire loss in New York City; $230,000,000 annual fire loss in the country at large, and for the constantly increasing percentage of cases where there are two or more fires in the same building and two or more claims from the same claimant.
The most common and perhaps least understood phrase found in policies of fire insurance is what is known as the “Commission Clause,” which reads “his own or held by him in trust or on commission or sold but not delivered” or “re¬ moved.” This clause in one form or another has been in use for many years, and it was originally the impression of un¬ derwriters that owing to the personal nature of the insurance contract a policy thus worded would simply cover the prop¬ erty of the insured and his interest in the property of others, such as advances and storage charges, but the courts have disabused their minds of any such narrow interpretation and have placed such a liberal construction upon the words “held in trust” that they may be justly regarded as among the broadest in the insurance language and scarcely less com¬ prehensive than the familiar term “for account of whom it may concern”; in fact, the principles controlling one phrase are similar to those governing the other.
It has been held that whether a merchant or bailee has assumed responsibility, or agreed to keep the property cov¬ ered or whether he is legally liable or not, if his policies contain the words “held in trust,” the owner may, after a fire, by merely ratifying the insurance of the bailee, appro¬ priate that for which he paid nothing whatever and may file proofs and bring suit in his own name against the bailee’s insurers. Nor is this all, for in some jurisdictions, if the bailee fails to include the loss on property of the bailor in his claim against his insurers, or if he does include it and the amount of insurance collectible is less than the total loss, the bailee may not first reimburse himself for the loss on his own goods and hold the balance in trust for the owners, but must prorate the amount actually collected with those own¬ ers who may have adopted the insurance, although, if he has a lien on any of the goods for charges or advances, this may be deducted from the proportion of insurance money due such owners The phrase “for account of whom it may concern” was formerly confined almost entirely to marine insurance, but in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to intro¬ duce it into policies of fire insurance.
All authorities are agreed that the interests protected by a policy containing these words must have been within the contemplation of him who took out the policy at the time it was issued. It is not necessary that he should have in¬ tended it for the benefit of some then known and particular individuals, but it would include such classes of persons as were intended to be included and who these were may be shown by parol. The owners or others intended to be cov¬ ered may ratify the insurance after a loss and take the bene¬ fit of it, though ignorant of its existence at the time of the issuance of the policy, just the same as under the term “held in trust.”
The words “for account of whom it may concern” are not limited in their protection to those persons who were concerned at the time the insurance was taken out, but will protect those having an insurable interest and who are con¬ cerned at the time when the loss occurs. They will cover the interest of a subsequent purchaser of a part or the whole of the property and supersede the alienation clause of the policy (U. S. S. C.), Hagan and Martin vs. Scottish Union and National Ins. Co., 32 Ins. Law Journal, p. 47; 186 U. S. 423).
A contract of insurance written in the name of “John Doe & Co. for account of whom it may concern” should contain a clause reading “Loss, if any, to be adjusted with and payable to John Doe & Co.,” not “loss, if any, payable to them” or “loss, if any, payable to the assured,” as forms sometimes read.
Policies are frequently written in the name of a bailee covering “On merchandise, his own and on the property of others for which he is responsible,” or “for which he may be liable”—and it has been held that’the effect of these words is to limit the liability of the insurer to the loss on the assured’s own goods and to his legal liability for loss on goods belonging to others, but the words “for which they are or may be liable” have been passed upon by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and they have been given an entirely dif¬ ferent interpretation. That tribunal in the case of The Home Insurance Company vs. Peoria & Pekin Union Railway Co. (28 Insurance Law Journal, p. 289; 178 Ills. 64) decided that the words quoted were merely descriptive of the cars to be insured; that the word “liable” as used in the policy did not signify a perfected or fixed legal liability, but rather a con¬ dition out of which a legal liability might arise.
As illustrative of its position the court said that an assignor of a negotiable note may, with no incorrectness of speech, be said to be liable upon his assignment obligation is not an absolute fixed legal liability but is con¬ tingent upon the financial condition of the maker; and ac¬ cordingly held that the insurance company was liable for loss on all the cars in the possession of the railroad company, notwithstanding the fact that the latter was not legally liable to the owners.
In view of the exceedingly broad construction which the courts have placed upon the time honored and familiar phrases to which reference has been made, it is important for the party insured, whether it be a railroad or other transportation company, a warehouseman, a laundryman, a tailor, a com¬ mission merchant or other bailee, to determine before the fire whether he desires the insurance to be so broad in its cover as to embrace not only his own property and interest, but also the property of everybody else which may happen to be in his custody; if so, he should be careful to insure for a sufficiently large amount to meet all possible co-insurance conditions,, and if he wishes to make sure of being fully reimbursed for his own loss, his only safe course is to insure for the full value of all the property in his possession.
At this point the inquiry which naturally presents itself is, how should a policy be written if a merchant, warehouse¬ man or other bailee desires to protect his own interest but not the interest of any one else? The following form is suggested: “On merchandise his own, and on his interest in and on his legal liability for property held by him in trust or on commission or on joint account with others, or sold but not removed, or on storage or for repairs, while con¬ tained, etc.” This will, it is believed, limit the operation of co-insurance conditions and at the same time prevent the owners from adopting, appropriating or helping themselves to the bailee’s insurance, for which they pay nothing and to which they are not equitably entitled.
Many of the household furniture forms now in use, in addition to embracing almost every conceivable kind of per¬ sonal property except that specifically prohibited by the pol¬ icy conditions, are also made to cover similar property be¬ longing to any member of the family or household, visitors, guests and servants.
This form would seem to indicate considerable ingenu¬ ity on the part of the broker, broad liberality on the part of the insurance company and commendable generosity on the part of the insured, and the latter would probably feel more than compensated by being able to reimburse his guest for any fire damage he might sustain while enjoying his hospi¬ tality, but the amount of insurance carried under such a form should anticipate the possibility of his having a number of guests at one time and a corresponding increase in the value at risk.
It must be borne in mind that in localities where co- insurance conditions prevail the value of property belonging